World Waiting for Obama

This article from Guardian correspondents around the globe has been picked up by Melbourne’s Age newspaper as Change they want. Some of the comments include:

From Kabul

“I think we have almost reached the point of no return. There are no good solutions left,” said Ali Padsha, 19, who was raised in America. “The longer foreign forces stay, the more problems will be created. When we [Afghans] see foreign forces in our country, it makes us crazy, it always has.

“The new Taliban are smarter than before and not as hardcore. They know what to do to keep the people happy.”

From Paris

“We don’t lynch Americans in the street,” said Charlotte Lepri, a US specialist at the French thinktank, Institute for Research in Integrated Strategies (IRIS). “But there are certain associations with Bush. Now there is a turnaround and real enthusiasm for a black candidate who represents France’s ideal of the American dream.”

From Gaza

Like many Gazans, Mohammed Telbani, the factory’s general manager, says he has little interest in the election. “Presidents have changed but no one did anything for us,” he said, waving his hand dismissively. He doubts that a new president will have the power or the will to reverse decades of US policy in the Middle East which he, like most here, sees as decisively pro-Israeli. “Without pressure on Israel there won’t be any solution to the problem,” he said.

The world holds its breath as America decides

For more views from outside the United States please visit Voices without Votes, where bloggers from around the globe analyse the US election.

Kevin Rennie

Obama’s lead beyond the Bradley effect

A couple of US election sites which are worth a visit:

A hard look at reality, and what you should do is from Sam Wang at the Princeton Election Consortium:

By the standards of Presidential elections since 1992, Barack Obama is far ahead. For most of this season he has been running about 50 EV ahead of where John Kerry ran at the same point in 2004, which ended in a near-tie. Currently the gap is even larger – it’s nearing Clinton v. Dole proportions. In the face of a down economy and abysmal approval ratings for the Bush Administration, a lead of this size by a Democrat is essentially insurmountable.

This is why John McCain’s tactics have become increasingly savage – it’s his last stand.

…In short, the wind is at Barack Obama’s back. I currently expect a final outcome of Obama 318-364 EV, McCain 174-220 EV.

He dismisses the Bradley effect, where polling overstates black candidates popularity, as no longer relevant. He claims that it only ever represented 2-3% anyway.

The Reuters/C-SPAN/Zogby Poll has Obama 49%,to McCain’s 43%. It’s daily telephone tracking poll:

The rolling telephone tracking poll, including a sample of 1,206 likely voters collected over the previous three 24-hour periods spanning four calendar days – approximately 400 per 24-hour period from Oct. 8-11, 2008 – shows Obama’s lead growing from the 3.8 percentage points he enjoyed yesterday.

Obama’s lead in the polls is now beyond the usual margins of error. A 2% Bradley effect would have him slightly in front of McCain. Even a surge on Wall Street like the one happening today in Australia is unlikely to save McCain’s campaign.

Time to have a bet on Barack and look for a bargain or two on the stock exchange?

Kevin Rennie
Original post at Labor View from Bayside

Torture R US

I thought the US did not torture?

In the debate last weekend between McCain and Obama, McCain said something that seemed to be at odds with what we have been told all along by the US (and their apologists).

McCain said:

I have opposed the president on spending, on climate change, on torture of prisoner…

Now – if the US does not torture, why is McCain opposed to it?

Either they do torture – in which case they have been lying to us.

Or they do not torture – in which case what is McCain opposed to?