Honeymoon continues

The latest Morgan poll seems to have slipped in below the radar. If the numbers were in any way bad for the ALP the news would be shouted from the rooftops, but no – it was bad for the coalition and so the news was kept quiet.

On a two-party preferred basis, support for the ALP is 61% (up 4%), while support for the L-NP is 39% (down 4%). If a Federal Election were held today the ALP would easily retain Government.

Among the minor parties, support for the Greens is 8% (up 2%), support for Family First 1.5% (unchanged) and Independents/Others 4% (down 1%).

The Roy Morgan Government Confidence Rating has risen to 125 (up 4pts) with 53.5% (up 3pts) of Australians confident that Australia is “heading in the right direction”, compared to 28.5% (down 1pt) that say Australia is “heading in the wrong direction.”

These numbers are not good to Malcolm Tumbleturn, who just keeps saying that the government is wrong.

But remember – the high you fly the further you can fall.

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72 Responses

  1. Costello’s “Magic Pudding” economy was marked by runaway inflation. But there’s no inflation in the cost of his Memoirs. It’s now in bookshop clearance bins at 90% off! That’s the hardcover version.

    http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,25293627-5000117,00.html

    With Rudd holding a 45-point lead over Tantrumbill, the story reignites the ever-simmering Costello leadership “speculation”.

    Like his book, Costello will be a fizzer, even if he did miraculously find the gonads to make a challenge.

  2. Poor Tip, even amongst the voters he does not have the numbers.

  3. Rudd’s popularity will soon nose-dive! He has lost the ‘hostie’ vote which will spread to all those who work in the service industry. He has lost the grazier vote as we now know he is the first PM to not eat ‘red meat’.

    And just wait to the Budget where the ‘sin’ taxes will go through the roof. He is living on borrowed time likely to be swept from office in a torrent of gin and beer.

  4. I think, N5, means ginger beer, joni

    (brewed in Bundaberg – great stuff – very Queensland)

  5. N5

    Don’t you think that the public is a bit more knowledgable? They know that taxes will have to go up on non-luxury items to cover some of the lost revenue due to the GFC.

    And it was interesting hearing some of the comments by the public to Rudd’s “Air Rage” incident – most seem to be forgiving as he apologised. Maybe because we have all had a need to explode on a flight because of “service”.

  6. TB I was referring to Gladstone who lost the 1874 British election because he:

    restricted the opening hours in public houses; regulated the content of beer; gave local authorities the power to determine licensing hours and gave boroughs the option of banning all alcohol

    The drinking classes disliked that direction and voted him out. In his words he was:

    swept from office in a torrent of gin and beer.

    His loss, if the truth be known was down to a number of other factors.

    joni

    Don’t you think that the public is a bit more knowledgeable

    I hope so. But given Rudd’s wowserism, there is the real danger he will overdo the ‘sin’ taxes. As for:

    most seem to be forgiving as he apologised

    Indeed! He learnt the importance of that from Beattie. Get in early and apologise, even if you think it’s unwarranted. It’s something Howard never learnt.

  7. Maybe because we have all had a need to explode on a flight because of “service”.

    More like lack of service. This incident does raise another issue.

    i wonder if the bastions of privatisation realise just how angry Australians are at the poor and shoddy service being offered by business to it’s paying customers whilst the managers and CEO’s are raking in the $.

    Shareholders want something down done as they are consumers too, but they are powerless unless some changes are made.

    In Rudd’s case it is the taxpayer who foots the bill for the changes being made to accommodate the PM (apparently it warrants another person coming in especially so the PM can get what he asks for) and also the possible stress leave for the RAAF personnel.

  8. sorry, down = done

    joni: fixed

  9. Grabbing my trusty old calculator [Tandy solar powered from ’75 still works a treat..but that’s another story], Turnbull’s average approval since taking over is 24.45 (rounded). Nelson’s last score was 26.5 and likewise counting 19 polls an average of 19.75. And so only a modest improvement (especially given Nelson’s last score of 26.5) and waaaayy short of expectations from Turnbull.

  10. It is difficult to see how the gloss will wear off this government.

    Rudd is a savvy performer, and a hard worker (though with a bad temper). He will continue to maintain his personal authority over the caucus and the factional leaders for as long as he remains popular.

    He is unlikely to be blamed for a continuing economic downturn, and will be given accolades for any upturn.

    The only political problem likely to emerge is the quality of his (His?) ministry. It is very patchy, and full of those that love the political intrigue more than policy detail and administration.

    There are plenty of dangers for Rudd in this orientation of his ministry.

  11. @Tom of Melbourne:
    It’s scary how often I am agreeing with you lately… if only I wasn’t the beneficiary of unions before I became a (moderately successful) contractor 🙂

    On topic, I think you’re right that the brand of “Kevin Rudd” is going to stay clean for some time yet. Unless something dark and/or creepy crawls out of his closet (like Ruddy Rudd dresses in latex on the weekends); the PM’s personal traits and media savvy will keep the opinion of him high.

    That said, his ministry is doing a bang up job of balancing his good performance with their bad one. Whilst Fitzgibbon’s non-declaration of paid trips is not high on my list of “Bad Things”, his denial of it was. I can forgive the omission of logging trips paid for by family friends, I cannot forgive lying about it when it is brought to his attention. The less said about Conroy the better (his handling of the “Internet Censorship” stuff is appalling). If it weren’t for Gillard & Wong – I’d say he’d really ballsed up his choice of ministry beyond redemption.

  12. Tom of Melbourne, on April 6th, 2009 at 9:40 am Said:

    quality of his (His?) ministry.

    His?. I wonder about that. Certainly Rudd claims that the ministry is ‘his’ but it’s probably the same as the situation with Premier Bligh here in Queensland who said she would pick the ministry. The fact that her ‘selections’ matched the factional power bases was, supposedly, purely coincidental.

    I don’t know the factional alignments with the Feds so I can’t comment except to say that the ‘factions’ are certainly keeping their heads down.

    Personally, I don’t think the Ministers as a whole are performing too badly so I am interested in your comment:

    full of those that love the political intrigue more than policy detail and administration.

    Apart from Julia (whom you identified earlier) are there any other names worth mentioning?

  13. Min

    I manitained when we first had blogs regarding the replacing of Nelson with Turnbull that Nelson had been sacrificed and he would have been the better Opposition Leader to bring about the reformation of the liberals to an electable party.

    I still maintain this opinion and it appears the polls reflect this if they are to be believed.

  14. Shane..I agree. Via the Morgan Poll, Nelson had turned around a very poor start and was starting to make a noticeable improvement when he was shafted. So much so that Nelson was 6 points over Turnbull’s current rating (under ‘who do you think will win’).

    I think that the Libs should be looking for talent, and do it now as it is not foregone conclusion that Costello will even contest the next election.

  15. N5 – yes His. Given His popularity, it is only a matter of time before this becomes the common way of addressing Him.

    I don’t want to provide a detailed critique here of the ministry. Some are very capable.

    Among those that I suspect are more oriented towards political intrigue – Albanese, Carr, Ferguson, Roxon. There are also many that seem to lack the horsepower for the job, eg is Smith as good as Hayden or Evans? Is Swan as capable as Keating or Dawkins? Fitzgibbon vs Beasley, McClelland vs Evans, Carr vs Button etc…

    I reflect that the point of decline for the Keating Government was the appointment of people like Richardson and Ray to the ministry.

  16. Tom of Melbourne, on April 6th, 2009 at 10:50 am Said:

    There are also many that seem to lack the horsepower for the job, eg is Smith as good as Hayden or Evans? Is Swan as capable as Keating or Dawkins? Fitzgibbon vs Beasley, McClelland vs Evans, Carr vs Button etc

    I’ll accept that when comparisions are made the incumbents look somewhat ‘light’ but I wonder if that isn’t always a problem when one compares the ‘new’ with the ‘experienced’. Having said that I think Smith for one is over-rated given his ‘work’ in other areas. Always seems too cautious.

    As for:

    more oriented towards political intrigue

    I’m not sure they will have much time for that, particularly in the weeks ahead. The Cabinet Budget Review Committee is now at work and that will prove a very stressful time for all Ministers, particularly those not across their brief.

    Rudd who hates ‘factionalism’ might provide some paybacks if indeed factional activity has been apparent.

  17. It seems sometimes that political commentators are getting impatient about these levels of popularity.

    Often reports end with something like “but the government may not sustain this level of support once the unemployment levels go up” etc.

  18. By the way Ben, you should start disagreeing with me now.

    “If it weren’t for Gillard & Wong – I’d say he’d really ballsed up his choice of ministry beyond redemption.”

    I think Gillard will prove to be one of the disasters of the government. She has a history of policy failure.

    Penny Wong seems pretty capable, despite her having to be pressed ganged into working for a union for a while (it’s the only way to get a seat).

  19. I think Gillard will prove to be one of the disasters of the government. She has a history of policy failure.

    She may yet prove to be an issue, but at the moment she’s doing pretty darn well in my opinion. Her acerbic wit keeps smart-asses in the opposition from playing word-games for headlines.

    Also, we already know we disagree on industrial relations (you think WorkChoices was good, I thought it a blight on Australian history), so we’re never going to agree on her policies unless she brings in “no card, no job” laws.

    Interesting to think we’re seeing eye-to-eye on Penny Wong though. Labour’s factions are union heavy, Liberals are business heavy. Getting anywhere in either party means kissing butt to someone, sad fact of politics.

  20. Re Rudd’s team. Well, there is no way that anyone other than Gillard could have even attempted such an extensive portfolio. And amazingly compared with Howard/Costello or Turnbull/Costello there seems to be little angst or jealousy.

    I like Wong, she has always been very competant. I like (shoot me) Garrett. I think that should Labor win the next election then there will be a lot more of Garrett.

    And Harry Jenkins (wow..what a fantastic surname!).

    Remember all the complaints about Hawker but none re Jenkins.

  21. I must say I continue to be surprised at the ongoing popularity of the ALP Government. I suppose it’s a comparitive thing and Turnbull has been pretty woeful so far. Hard to know whether Costello would achieve better numbers given his woeful relationship with the Press. He’s clearly the best equipped, but the media just seem to hate him. All that said, I wonder what the Federal Budget will bring. At some point, payment must be made for all of the spending in recent months. Swan has had some difficulty in the past and it will be interesting to see if he can deliver a budget without so much money. If the numbers don’t start to balance up in June, I’ll be mightily surprised.

  22. n5, if he’s lost all those votes, he must have gained many more to balance the loss and in fact increase his popularity. I don’t think KR is too worried about losing the votes of the graziers, if he actually had them in the first place. Most are rusted on Nats and if they did vote for KR at the last election, would have soon deserted him. That is a big if. The ALP would go to the wall if it relied on support from the cockies. This is akin to saying JH had lost support of the Unions. Incredible, isn’t it Rudd losing support from the rusted on cow cockies but actually gaining support of the average Australian punter. I can see the ALP strategists breaking out in car bunkles worrying about this…not.

  23. James

    “He’s clearly the best equipped but the media seem to hate him”

    I don’t care if the media like or hate anyone, the probelm with Costello is that the public don’t want him as Prime Minister either. He might be selected as the best Prime Minister from the liberal baggage of Turnbull and Co but he is not selected as the best person for Prime Minister when you include Rudd.

    Regarding payment via the polls for budget spending decisions. the thing is the spending was to the lower income and disadvantaged in our community, not massive tax cuts for the wealthy. Therefore I see no drop due to budgetary measures that for once gave back to the 7 million low income tax payers and pensioners and careres of the disabled. Many more low income voters than wealthy tax avoiding media and banking barons.

  24. N5

    I don’t know of any farmer during my 25 years travelling the country with the CBA that liked the ALP. The ALP were hated with a passion and branded the cause of anything and everything that went wrong with any country town, even if the actions were being implemented by a LNP government.

    When you see votes for the ALP in country areas they are usually the government workers like Police, Ambos and the like that support the ALP. Bearing in mind that only 50% of these probably support the ALP, but this is the source of ALP votes in rural electorates, not a few farmers voting ALP.

  25. Shane, the public once considered Howard unelectable too, well twice now. But the Libs really need a coherent message on the economy and Turnbull’s not a leader’s derriere in my opinion.

    As to the budget, I’m not talking about the measures so far, which I fundamentally disagree with but accept are broadly popular, I’m talking about what happens when this is all spelt out on budget night in terms of deficits, tax increases in some areas etc.

  26. James of North Melbourne, on April 6th, 2009 at 1:04 pm.

    Excellent summary James – Turnbull woeful, unknown if Costello would do better..perhaps he could do better by drawing on his Italian ancestry/Italian supporters.

    (with apologies, saw this one recently. The name Costello is Cornish and not Italian..many Cornish names are often mistaken for being Italian).

    Costello re: “He’s clearly the best equipped but the media seem to hate him”

    Costello has been given an excellent run by the media. That all of his media releases have been given space. In fact Costello probably has been given more than Turnbull.

    Anway..I should imagine that Australia, the G20, global warming etc will just have to sit on his/her thumbs waiting to see what Costello does next. I am certain that it will be a thrill a minute.

  27. James

    I don’t think people are as concerned about a deficit in the current climate. It is the same as a business borrowing, you could call that a deficit as well. But borrow they do to prop up their business during unexpected circumstances or to expand. A farmer is a classic example, borrow during droughts or floods and repay during good times. Government is doing exactly the same and since it is expected to operate as a business and make profits ( surpluses) instead of operate as a service to the country, it should also be permitted to borrow as well. Those expecting a government to operate as a going concern need to understand it will have the same ups and downs as a private company.

  28. Shane I think if a private company started borrowing money to hand out to shareholders or customers with no measureable long term benefit, the shareholders would sack the board. Deficits are fine, providing the bang for the buck can be seen. It can’t, and it won’t. The Press and commentators have given Kevin Rudd an extraordinarily long leash here and I think he is going to hang himself.

  29. James

    But the deficit will not really be as a result of the handouts, more due to the collapse in taxation revenue – which I believe is predicted to be over $115 billion over the next four years.

  30. dave, on April 6th, 2009 at 1:33 pm Said:

    n5, if he’s lost all those votes,

    I thought I made it fairly obvious I was taking the piss. Despite no support from the MSM and indeed nit-picking at every chance, Rudd’s popularity continues at stratospheric levels.

    shaneinqld, on April 6th, 2009 at 1:42 pm Said:

    The ALP were hated with a passion and branded the cause of anything and everything that went wrong with any country town

    Yes! Membership of the National Party is bestowed at the Christening and then they learn to whinge at their mothers’ knees. Generally the Nats see government in terms of ‘pork’ and how it is to be distributed. It is the dominant ‘common sense’, in contrast to Labor and Liberal who have some affinity to Principle as a guiding motive.

  31. James

    Private companies do borrow to hand out to shareholders. Quite often there are insufficient earnings to mantain dividends promised or announced to shareholders previously. As a result finance is raised to mantain that dividend despite losses being made or being forecast.

  32. n5

    Despite the previous government ripping services from country towns for 11 years including taxation offices and other federal government representation. The deregulation of the dairy industry which benefited only the retail sector and many other LNP decisions the rural community were silent.

    Then when trouble was brewing about the massive withdrawal of services, the previous government introduced a rural services scheme and brought back a few token representations where you can get forms and the like in the one location, but could not talk to a staff member or sit down and seek advice. Many were linked to Post Offices or Newsagencies. This was then lauded by the same rural communities as proof the previous government was looking after rural communities.

    I am a swinging voter but can see bulls*it a mile away.

  33. Joni, it’s both, and political reality says that the focus will be on the money spent (read squandered). Remember we are talking about polls here. Shane, you know what I mean and you are picking nits. The $900 is NOT going to stave off recession. The pink batts are NOT going to stave off recession. I do not understand the motivation for the Aust and US Government running the line that they are at the moment. It won’t work, it can’t work, and we are going to lose the war chest into the bargain. It’s almost as if they are trying to sabotage the economy to score a political/idealogical point.

  34. Maybe it wont keep the recession away – but will it reduce the effects of the recession? That is the whole point of the exercise.

    And you say it is about the polls, well the opposition has been harping on about the $96 billion deficit, the new deficit and how our children will pay for it – and it has no effect on the polls so far. So what makes you think it will change in the future?

  35. James

    I tried to point out to you the publics perception and why it has had no effect on the polls. In addition you were saying what will happen when a deficit is revealed and possible tax increases. Once again I was trying to tell you how the majority of the voters are thinking and why it will still not have an effect opn the polls. You were the one who came up with the analogy of borrowing to pay shareholders and customers.

  36. Joni, it won’t do that either. It’s like standing on a beach trying to hold back the tide. Recessions and depressions are in themselves psychological conditions. They are often brought on by financial crises, but the condition can only be properly treated over time. And by splashing all of this cash (and for that matter, slashing interest rates to almost nothing), they are reducing our capacity to recover over the longer term. And if I hear once again that “at least they are trying something” I will scream. “Trying” is for primary school footballers. This is far more serious.

  37. As for the polls, when the cash splash is done, and the party is over, and the hangover needs to be dealt with, the popular guy from the night before handing out all the free piss will no longer be viewed as such a good bloke, but rather, the bloke that got us all pissed.

  38. James

    With respect – I do not think you are correct.

  39. Hmmm

    I’m not so pessimistic James..

    The stimulus initiatives are always designed to be temporary. Basically designed to keep the economy ticking over as much as possible.

    I agree that we’re not immune to the overall Global recessionary trend, however Australia is in a far better position than the US, UK or Europe.

    Eventually markets will bottom out (some people are already saying that this has happened) and markets will begin to recover. Some people are cautiously optimistic that there are some signs that this is beginning to happen too.

    While no one can accurately predict what will happen next week or in a month’s time, I believe the fact that the panic selling we saw on share markets six months ago is now a thing of the past – suggests that markets have bottomed out.

    History suggests that when markets do recover – they do so very quickly. Even though the positive effects may take a while to filter through to the economy.

  40. Re: And Harry Jenkins (wow..what a fantastic surname!).~~~~

    Apologies..it may have gone astray. My non married name is Jenkins.

    And cousin was Jerka..no not Jerka (Graham) Jenkin but the original Jerka (John) Jenkins who later coached Coburg.

  41. I don’t think Rudd is likely to carry much opprobrium for the current stimulus spending, even though I think some is poorly targeted.

    He is not getting a reputation for lazy or ineffective economics.

    The previous experience of ALP governments are Whitlam, who had a spending program that he was determined to implement regardless of the impact the additional spending had on inflation, and Hawke/Keating.

    Hawke & Keating were never going to repeat the crash and burn experience. In the end, the problem for Keating was structural, and the impossibility of managing all the interest groups, and their narrow perspectives. They stymied his efforts for continuing reform.

    The Rudd government does not have to deal with either of these types of problems right now. So he can remain popular for as long as his ministers don’t stuff it up on him.

  42. Professor Quiggan supports what Rudd is doing. According to Mike Mike Steketee, Quiggan:

    argues that income and company taxes will have to increase to support the greater role of government as a result of the radical transformation of the economy and society by the global financial crisis

    the greater role of government. Who would have thought? The neo-liberals will be gnashing their teeth. He goes on:

    The crisis is not a temporary aberration, to be followed by a return to the ‘normality’ of the late 20th century, dominated by the ideology of economic liberalism,” …

    “Rather, the economic and social system that emerges from the global financial crisis will be radically transformed.”

    radically transformed economic economic and social system. Indeed! A greater role for the State in in providing the framework for security of employment, income and wealth and enforcing the rules.

    Quiggan argues that the promised tax cuts should be abandoned on equity grounds, given that those who earn less than $80 000 will get about $3 a week. Nevertheless I still think Rudd will still provide a tax cut because he ‘promised’ and also because he will want to cover all the political/economic ideological bases.

    Quiggan concludes that the baby should not be thrown out with the bathwater but the best of the current system should be incorporated.

    More here:

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,,25294566-2702,00.html

  43. I must say I continue to be surprised at the ongoing popularity of the ALP Government.

    I’m not.

  44. Dudd will start sliding in popularity once he has run out of Bogan money and we are left with a massive deficit with sweet FA to show for it

  45. You’re funny davo.

  46. Essential 63-37
    Newspoll 58-42

    In the Newspoll, Turnbull has dipped below the 20% level (where he has been hovering for a while) on PPM to 18% (Rudd at 68%). The figures suggest more people are unhappy with Turnbull than are happy with him as well.

    Possumes take here

  47. I mean ‘Possum’s’ (don’t know why an e and a ‘ got mixed up – they aren’t even close on the keyboard (Sorry Poss))

  48. I’ve been called worse Dave!

  49. Dave55

    Loved your comment at Possum’s

    But but but … he makes girls cry and he’s a commie spy

    From Possum’s link

    The big news of the day comes not from Turnbull’s record poor result in the beauty contest of Preferred PM, but from his continuing slide into unelectability via his satisfaction differentials. Approximately 100, 000 people per week are changing from being satisfied to being dissatisfied with Malcolm Turnbull’s performance – normally the trend is your friend in polling, but trends like these are friends Malcolm could well do without.

    More here. And click on the graphs they are revealing.

    http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollytics/2009/04/07/newspoll-100k-a-week-edition/#more-4401

  50. I got Rudd’s PPM wrong as well, it’s only 67% 🙄

    I blame the early start and return to EST :mrgreen:

  51. The Poll Bludger also provides a POV that’s worth a read.

    http://blogs.crikey.com.au/pollbludger/2009/04/06/newspoll-58-42-5/

    Note also:

    reported that litigious Queensland mining billionaire Clive Palmer plans to bankroll a campaign by the WA Nationals to win a Senate seat at the next federal election

    Clive having bought both the Liberal and National Parties in QLD is now looking at a takeover in WA. Some might remember Clive as the corporate benefactor who was going to donate millions to aboriginal health in WA. Lol.

    Any update on any dollars changing hands would be appreciated,

  52. Nature 5, on April 6th, 2009 at 5:03 pm

    The Quiggin longitudinal domestic analysis, perhaps, would seem to yield interesting implications when compared with the output from the recent G20 Summit; particularly when it comes to considerations of, and nominations of, ‘tax havens’, and differentials in tax regimes likely to attract or repel flows of all sorts of things.

  53. Was just thinking of the ‘whys’. Turnbull took over the Liberal leadership on a high. And so what has gone wrong?

    Am thinking, that the Libs did not learn from the last election..that the public became sick and tired of smear and fear. Therefore to run a 3 month old story (from an unknown source) during the G20 was interpreted as just that.

    Now add to this the Libs being seen as obstructionist rather than adding to the debate. And there you have it. Mr 18%.

  54. An election is a bit like an interview for a job, with the position becoming available via a ‘spill’. On the one hand, we have the incumbent, Kevin. On the other hand, we have Malcolm. Ignoring Kevin for the moment, whose work performance is on public display 24/7, let’s examine Malcolm. What is Malcolm presenting at his job interview? Blocking, stalling, whining, hyperbolic ad hominems about Kevin, apparently. But, and it’s a big but, what is Malcolm presenting as his value-adding proposition to the interviewer? Saying Kevin is bad, bad, bad is not a value-adding proposition.

  55. Min,

    I agree. It’s really hard to fathom why Malcolm’s popularity (or lack thereof) is so bad.

    I reckon you’re right in saying that they (the Libs) are so used to running fear n smear campaigns, or (more recently) objecting, just for the sake of being objectionable, that they really know no other tactics.

    It’s like they’re so completely lacking in alternative visions and bereft of any original thought. With people like Joe Hockey on board as their mouthpiece, they really have no hope at all….

  56. Malcolm is rich, and at the moment the majority of people hate rich bastards because their greed f***ed the whole economy for everyone.

    Not saying that it is the right outlook to have or even true in many cases, but it seems to be the feeback I am getting.

  57. shaneinqld, on April 7th, 2009 at 11:36 am Said:

    “Malcolm is rich, and at the moment the majority of people hate rich bastards because their greed f***ed the whole economy for everyone.”

    I think it’s more that the public sees him, and the rest of the Libduds, no doubt as a complete w@nker who doesn’t have a clue!

    Good to see Eyes Bishop’s blether about Rudd being a bully is being given the respect it so richly deserves by the public, who no doubt remember the enthusiastic bullying of refugees arriving in this country by the Libduds and their arch-bully the Rodent.

  58. reb and min

    It’s really hard to fathom why Malcolm’s popularity (or lack thereof) is so bad.

    really – What exactly has Turnbull offered in the way of an alternative to the Government or, put another way, what has he done that would support you saying he has done a satisfactory job? People are remined of fuel watch every time they drive past a service station in the afternoon and curse that the price has gone since they drove past in the morning and promised to fill up on the way home (tuesday or not), the opposition to the alcopops legislation just looked stupid, it was clear that the tax had reduced overall alcohol consumption so the opposition to it flew in the face of the rhetoric put forward by Turnbull and Co; the surrport but subsequent criticism of the initial cash payments looked silly – who cared what the statistics showed, the people had the money in their pocket and they knew what they did with it and you can bet your arse most people felt more finacially secure becasue of it that otherwise, they look at the next cash payments in the same way and recognise that it will go to some people who missed out last time; the investment in schools, insulation and housing seems appropriate so why was it opposed?

    So apart from oppose, what has he actually done aparrt from prattle on about communism, making air hostesses cry, bikins in the lodge and talking down the economy (while doing the same himself). He has offered nought policy alternatives and talked about pedantic irrelevant things when there were more pressing matters of concer like the GFC. Despite all the early rhetoric from the opposition about this being a do nothing Government, it now clearly is doding something and the opposition are the ones doing nothing. The only surprising thing about Turnbulls satisfaction rating is that nearly 40% of people think he’s doing a satisfactory job?

  59. The only surprising thing about Turnbulls satisfaction rating is that nearly 40% of people think he’s doing a satisfactory job?

    But they are the ‘rusted ons,’ they’d support him if he drank poison, went mad and shot both Abbott & Costello (come to think of it, so would I 🙂 )

  60. Jane and Shane..re rich bastards. Yet the public don’t have a problem with Therese being wealthy, nor with Garrett being wealthy.

    I think that it’s more to do with Turnbull being obstructionist, as in refusing to add to the debate. An example is Alcopops..some good things could have been done such as health warnings and real educational campaigns (akin to the early Grim Reaper adverts..instead of the current fluffy adverts funded by the alcohol industry).

    But instead Turnbull left the debate to Fielding. Therefore the conclusion is that Turnbull has nothing to say.

  61. Dave55,

    I don’t disagree with anything you’ve said there.

    I guess where I was coming from is that Talcum isn’t as near as close to being like the lying, filthy, two-faced rodent, of whom I loathed intensely.

    Talcum on the other hand, is much more moderate than his (comparatively) right wing colleagues..

    On another note, did anyone see Talcum on news last night – and there was the drag queen – Helen Coonan by his side with this riduculous brain dead expression on her face.

    “Look at that stupid f**kin’ old bag” I said to my partner. who replied that perhaps I was being a little bit harsh.

  62. Kitty..agree. Another point is that Turnbull’s rating ‘dissatisfied’ is now 42 to 39 ‘satisfied’ and so the first time into negative territory for Turnbull.

  63. kittylitter

    But they are the ‘rusted ons,’ they’d support him if he drank poison, went mad and shot both Abbott & Costello (come to think of it, so would I 🙂 )

    LOL So would I quite probably – but only because he’d actually be doing something constructive … in a destructive kind of way :-s Actually I shouldn’t be too harsh on Costello and Abbott., Cossie’s been the only conservative actually contributing something to the debate and Abbott’s ‘contributions’ have at least been humourous (although perhaps not in the manner he intended).

  64. Malcolm is rich, and at the moment the majority of people hate rich bastards because their greed f***ed the whole economy for everyone.

    Hi, I found the following quote quite interesting …

    Christopher Pearson, The Australian , 27 September 2008:

    Turnbull tends to see every issue through the prism of Wentworth, the inner-Sydney seat he holds by a narrow margin. It’s reckoned to be the gayest, richest and perhaps the most bohemian electorate in the country, light years away from the preoccupations of most of the people who regularly vote for the Coalition.

  65. An interesting observation from Paul Burns over at LP that Turnbull’s problems are that he simply isn’t good at politics:
    http://larvatusprodeo.net/2009/04/06/turnbull-the-new-mr-18-per-cent-labor-5842/#comment-685734

    I think that there is a lot to that. The comment from Obama to Gordon Brown last week that “good policy is also good politics” probably should be considered by Turnbull as well. Politics isn’t always about the cheap win. To use a cricketing analogy, the greatest cover drive for four to get you off the mark doesn’t count for much if you get out the next ball and your team is chasing a massive score; somethimes a carefully built innings is what is necessary. Turnbull sees himself as a Warner when they really need someone like Katich or Langer at the moment.

  66. Dave55, on April 7th, 2009 at 12:27 pm Said:

    And it’s worth repeating:

    Cossie’s been the only conservative actually contributing something to the debate

    Just could it be..that Turnbull hasn’t had anything worthwhile to offer and hence the reason that the press has had to focus on Costello. [cos their ‘impartial’ or umm grasping at straws].

    Logic would dictate that if Turnbull had mega to offer by way of challenging statements that they (the media) wouldn’t be much fussed about Costello.

  67. Min,

    It’s an interesting idea – maybe Turnbull is the bore and Cossie at least gives them something a little meatier to chew on.

    I’ll add to my comment about Costello’s contribution to the debate by noting that he hasn’t really been that big on offering solutions. There is plenty of observation and criticism there but Costello really hasn’t said what he would do if he was PM.

  68. Quite right Dave. For Costello, comment is an after-thought to be popped into one’s memoirs.

    This has to have been one of the worst runs for any Opposition, with the Golden Boy ending up being Mr 18%.

    I don’t have exact figures, but even Latham as his worst was doing better than Turnbull.

    The only thing that I can find is via Roy Morgan and interestingly, it was 50 Howard/38 Latham (Qu: who would make the better PM).

    http://www.roymorgan.com/news/polls/2004/3804/

  69. Min, on April 7th, 2009 at 12:19 pm Said:

    “Jane and Shane..re rich bastards. Yet the public don’t have a problem with Therese being wealthy, nor with Garrett being wealthy.”

    Min, I agree up to a point with what you say. The public is also well aware that Garrett’s money hasn’t come easy-he’s done the hard yards to get where he is financially. Ditto Therese Rein. She wasn’t born with a silver spoon in her mouth and had to work hard to get where she has. Having a good business brain hasn’t hurt, either.

    However, I’d contend that most people think Malvolio is the complete silvertail, born with a silver spoon in his mouth, merchant banker, never had to do an honest day’s work etc.

    And then he tries to come between the average punter and his/her $900; no wonder he’s not popular, he’s a bloody spoilsport and a rich one at that!

    I’m also not so sure that saying that Kevin Rudd is the wealthiest man in parliament, because his wife has a very successful career has gone down all that well with the punters, either.

    Simply put, Malvolio comes across as a vain, arrogant, policy-free naysayer whose only policy is to obstruct without offering any sensible alternative. And…….is it true the Libduds are considering blocking supply?

  70. With apologies Jane for the late reply.

    re: Simply put, Malvolio comes across as a vain, arrogant, policy-free naysayer whose only policy is to obstruct without offering any sensible alternative. And…….is it true the Libduds are considering blocking supply?

    Basically, I think yes. Maybe they think that they will have their chance re Broadband if they vote against it, leaving decisions once again to the Greens, Xenophon and (sigh) Fielding. Therefore, if such is being considered then we are likely to see mega in the popular press how the Polls have got it wrong.

  71. Addendum..and of course how having an up to speed Broadband for Australia is also WRONG.

  72. Yeah, Min. How can these dopes get it so wrong? I thought Malvolio had at least a modicum of sense,but these latest posturings are ludicrous!! ‘strordinary!

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