Fielding Practice

I have decided that no longer will the beer I have on Friday afternoons be called “Beer O’Clock” – it is now to be called Fielding Practice, in honour of the honourable senator from Victoria.

Update:

Hmm…. has someone been looking back over Blogocracy, because I think this might have been the first mention of Malcopops!

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29 Responses

  1. Or, as some smarty-pants Labor individual called them in parliament today, you could drink some Malcopops,/i>.

  2. lol, I’m gonna slam down Malcopops tonight until I can’t walk.

    Already have a decent headstart too.

  3. Yeah fine Toiletboss. I suggest you slam down Malcolm till HE cant walk.
    And Fielding mushrooms too.

    Plant both in field, out of direct sunlight, water regularly, fertilise regularly.

  4. Tony

    I heard the Malcopops comment as well and had a chuckle.

    It’s a 99 Xanadu (Margaret River) Cabernet blend (Reserve) for me tonight though … (and drinking very well I might add … very very well)

  5. FMD Dave, sounds good. Do you have a cellar, or do you buy them aged?

  6. Tony,

    Just going back to the previous thread (but keeping the discussion here), what was you view on the removal of the anomaly issue (spirits comparison alone)? I think we would all agree that the rest of the alcohol excise thing is a dogs breakfast but surely the different treatment of spirit in RTDs (malcopops) as opposed to straight spirits seems bizarre.

  7. Yes Dave, it looks an argument could be made for the whole thing to be reformed, and I would probably support that.

    But. (We were told) the purpose of this particular tax was to address teenage binge drinking. Full stop.

  8. I look forward to putting Fielding last when he comes up for re-election. Unfortunately, he’s no joking matter.

  9. Tony

    Both. I actually got that one on Grays on the weekend and thought I’d check to see how it was drinking. It cost me less than $20 a bottle landed and I’ve paid a lot more for worse.

    1999 XANADU WINES `COW ROCK` RESERVE CABERNET-MERLOT-CABERNET FRANC, MARGARET RIVER, WA. ORP $480 PER DOZEN. IN 1999 THIS LEADING MARGARET RIVER PRODUCER FOUND ITSELF WITH MORE STOCK OF THE FLAGSHIP LAGAN ESTATE RESERVE THAN THE MARKET REQUIRED. XANADU `DECLASSIFIED` THE EXCESS, REDUCED ITS PRICE AND MADE A NEW WINE NAMED AFTER A LOCAL LANDMARK.

  10. Sounds good Dave. Well done.

  11. Dave, my cousin was offloading some wine at Christmas and I picked up a couple of cases of Xanadu Secession Merlot for next to nothing. It is outstanding. Is that what you’re talking about?

  12. Sorry, forget that, should’ve read the thread.

  13. Tony,

    But. (We were told) the purpose of this particular tax was to address teenage binge drinking. Full stop.

    Don’t worry, I’m with you on the criticism of the rationale. The issue though as I see it is what did the legislation actually do. Every party spins the reasons for the legislation but the bulk of legislation is generally driven by the public servants who see something than needs to be fixed or corrected. Here, I have no doubt that the anomaly needed to be fixed, notr do I doubt that it made RTDs more accessible (affordable) for young drinkers. increasing the tax won’t stop binge drinking but it will reduce the consumption by some and that’s probably a good thing.

    Now – back to that Cabernet … 😉 (ah the hypocrisy)

  14. Now – back to that Cabernet … (ah the hypocrisy)

    Indeed, Dave. Indeed.

    🙂

  15. Dave55, I agree and in the end, the Coalition, not Fielding, should probably have passed it. BUT the Govt hardly can complain given the way they went about opposition and the way they have gone about trying to force legislation through.

  16. the way they have gone about trying to force legislation through.</blockquote?

    I had the same thoughts when listening to Ms Gillard today. She’s determined to crash through, or crash. Sadly for her and her IR reforms, it looks like being the latter.

  17. James,

    Re the Xanadu wines, they’re all pretty good as far as I can tell – or at least I haven’t had a bad one yet.

  18. I had the same thoughts when listening to Ms Gillard today. She’s determined to crash through, or crash. Sadly for her and her IR reforms, it looks like being the latter.

    I think they are still grappling with Government and negotiation tactics. That said, on the IR legislation, I think they have a point, particularly on the unfair dismissal aspect. They took that aspect of the legislation to the electorate and should continue with it. I have no problem with the Libs and Nats opposing it either – WC was their policy and they have every right to oppose its removal – after all, 47% of the population voted for them presumably for their policies so they should stand up for that support. The problem I have is with X and F. F didn’t have an IR policy and wasn’t voted in on that basis. Further, he got across the line in 04 based on Labor preferences – on this one, he should go with the will of the Government. X is a little different but he didn’t get elected on the basis of his IR policy either. By all means defend a view on the rights of union access to workplaces (which was unclear in the ALP policy) but not the unfair dismissal component.

    If the IR laws get blocked over the unfair dismissal aspect alone, the crash is hardly the fault of the ALP and I don’t think it will be seen that way either. I can’t see the Libs and Nats be punished for it either. The greens have said they will push for amendments but won’t oppose the leg so they will be OK as well. X an F on the other hand …anyone remember the Democrats …?

  19. If the Workchoices amendments are passed by the Senate, well and good, the Government has its win and can implement the policy it went to the people with in 2007.

    But even of they’re rejected, I can’t see how can a Senate failure to pass the IR Amendments can be anything but good news for the Government.

    If the Senate rejects the Legislation twice that will give the Government a DD trigger. Rudd can then go to a full House and Senate election, should he choose to do so, with Workchoices as the issue.

    Now there’s a nightmare scenario for the Libs.

    The damn thing cost them Government in 2007 and Howard his own seat and there’s nothing to suggest it’s any more popular with the people now. Global Credit Crisis or no, Workchoices is pure poison. You can bet your life the Opposition is sweating it-out behind the scenes right now, praying that Xeno and Champagne Charlie line-up with the Greens to pass the amendments so that tyhey can be rid at last of this particular albatross.

    So whether the amendments are passed or rejected, I reckon its a win-win situation for the Government.

    Ah Workchoices, the gift that just keeps on giving.

  20. Dave55 – “anyone remember the Democrats …?”

    Ask Evan, he’s an expert on the Democrats and ethics in politics.

  21. Evan

    I also think that if the legislation is not passed then Labor will just keep saying that it is WorkChoices that is causing the problems in the economy.

    I would have thought that the best option for the coalition would be to oppose the policy and to then abstain in the senate. That way they do not block the legislation and can then later say that they did not support it. To me that seems the only way for the coalition to save any political credibility on this matter.

  22. The idea that the ALP government could blame economic ills on any continuance of Workchoices seems strange to me.

    AWAs have gone, except as approved by the ALP.

    The safety net against the award is restored for assessment of industrial instruments.

    Employers can no longer make greenfield agreements without another party (ie a union) agreeing.

    Much of the ALP pre election policy is already in place.

    So exactly what are the really big issues that the Liberal/Nationals will be embarrassed about blocking.

    Perhaps Evan (who is an acknowledged expert in ethics and politics) would kindly explain.

  23. Tom

    It doesn’t matter about the reality of what Labor has done, I just think that the ALP (rightly or wrongly) will just keep saying that it is the coalition and work choices that is contributing to the downturn.

  24. Joni

    I’d prefer to hope that the public exercise a little more intelligence than you suggest. Most of Workchoices is now consigned to history, that’s the reality.

    A key remaining issue is unfair dismissal, and I’ve been critical of this since Workchoices was introduced. I’ve been completely perplexed as to why the ALP considered this issue to be so unimportant to allow the Workchoices standard to drag on for 1½ years.

    The current state of the roll back of Workchoices is – unfair dismissal standards (improvement is good public policy), union right of entry (union ownership appeasement, poor public policy), award modernisation (Gillard stuff up and union appeasement), get rid of the ABCC (union appeasement), establish Fair Work Australia (so what?).

    Other than the unfair dismissal provisions, this doesn’t look like a real vote winner for the ALP.

  25. Tom

    Oh I agree that I hope the public shows more intelligence – but when has that stopped the public. After all – the NSW voters put the ALP back into power!

    And also remember – that most voters are not as erudite and perceptive as the blogocrats 🙄

  26. joni, on March 19th, 2009 at 11:51 pm Said:

    “Tom

    Oh I agree that I hope the public shows more intelligence – but when has that stopped the public. After all – the NSW voters put the ALP back into power!”

    And kept voting the Rodent government back into power, joni. lol

  27. “Oh I agree that I hope the public shows more intelligence – but when has that stopped the public. After all – the NSW voters put the ALP back into power!”

    Was that a display of ‘lack of intelligence’ given the alternative? Many would argue that given Debnam’s and his policies that the NSW voters were demonstrating their intelligence – why vote for very bad when you can vote for slightly less bad?

  28. Huh

    Oh – I agree. I was just being flippant.

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