Federal Legislation

This is just a quick thread for a couple of important pieces of legislation that is before parliament at the moment:

  • Alcopops. This is the legislation to make the changes introduced last year into law, and it looks like being blocked in the senate. From what I can see, the tax change did exactly as intended – it reduced the consumption of alcopops and the research shows that this did not translate into a corresponding increase in hard liquor.
  • Electoral Reform. This is being blocked in the senate by the coalition, under the guise that it does not go far enough.

Are these potential triggers for a double dissolution?

UPDATE:

On the subject of alcopops, Tony of South Yarra, also makes this observation:

The government’s ill-conceived ‘alcopops’ tax is about to be voted down in the senate. Introduced ostensibly as the main weapon in Labor’s ‘war’ on binge drinking among teenage girls, it has failed to win the support of any of the non-government senators:

The Government faces the prospect of paying back almost $300 million to the alcohol industry and forgoing $1.6 billion in tax revenue after the Greens, independent Nick Xenophon and Family First’s Steve Fielding refused to endorse the tax.

The government is steeling itself for more trouble in the senate, with its emissions trading scheme and industrial relations reforms both looking unlikely to find the necessary upper-house support:

Greens senators Bob Brown, Rachel Siewert and independent Nick Xenophon made it clear they were not to be trifled with on the alcopops bill or other key government legislation.

“They (Labor) need to see that we are quite strong, quite determined and not going to be treated in this way by the (health) minister or the government,” Senator Brown said.

“We are serious about this and it’s up to the government to act like a government that understands the functioning of the Senate instead of expecting that the Senate is simply going to give it what it wants every time,” he said.

As Don Chipp would no doubt remind us if he were alive today, the role of the senate, and the balance-of-power cross-bench senators in particular, is to ‘keep the bastards honest’. Long may it be so.

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125 Responses

  1. Yes and on current pieces of legislation have a look at this bullcrap at this link

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25194021-12332,00.html

    Some comments by the communist

    “With Australia’s research workforce facing intense skills shortages, Julia Gillard said Australia would upgrade its recruitment of overseas students to aid the country’s research efforts. ”

    Even more BS

    “In a marked departure from past education ministers, Ms Gillard said research scholars would help build Australia’s future research capability and academic workforce. ”

    Whats wrong with our own kids??? We have people with PhD’s in this country
    who cannot get jobs in research and have to pick different careers. This is immoral. We have parents who have busted their guts bringing up their kids and find that their children who have university degrees have to compete with Russians, Poles and whatever for jobs in their own country. How many Russians have a HECS debt???

    They busted their guts getting degrees and find they have to compete with the rest of the world for jobs in the country they were born and raised.

    Dillard can get stuffed. So can all you leftoids who want to sell out our country

  2. The legitimate attempt to exercise some control over political donations has been virtually ignored in the MSM. A quick ‘google’ reveals the paucity of coverage. The proposals seem eminently sensible. In summary:

    lower the threshold for the disclosure of political donations and political expenditure to $1,000 – from the $10,900 index-linked threshold introduced by the Howard Government

    require six-monthly disclosure of donations and political expenditure, rather than just annual disclosure

    ban foreign donations

    ban anonymous donations over $50

    no longer allow donations to separate branches of the same party to be treated as separate donations for disclosure purposes, closing a loophole allowing multiple donations below the threshold to be hidden, and

    tie receipt of public funding for elections to verified electoral expenditure, so that candidates are not able to make a financial gain from public funding. ”

    Take the last point about, only paying money if there is evidence of expenditure. It’s clearly designed to prevent ‘rorts’ by people like Hanson in Senate elections and would mirror what already happens in Queensland at the State level.

    Again the Opposition adopts the defence, (if one can call it so) that they are opposed because ‘it doesn’t go far enough’. Leading the charge is the adolescent Pyne who says:

    This bill represents a partisan and piecemeal approach to a serious issue,” he said.

    “If the government was serious about electoral reform, they would have done a great deal more than simply cherry-picking the ideas that serve Labor’s own political advantage.”

    http://www.thewest.com.au/aapstory.aspx?StoryName=558592

    Because it is being re-introduced and by all accounts is likely to be again rejected, a trigger’s been created for a DD. Not an issue that any sensible leader would choose to fight an election on. But then again there’s a lot at stake here for the Liberal Party.

    text

  3. Will reply indepth on this in a few minutes. Just wanted to thank joni for putting it up 🙂

  4. N5

    Yeah – I found it really hard last week to find anything on the Electoral Reform legislation… which is why I did not put up a dedicated thread.

    BTW – anyone catch Abbott last night on Lateline? He is still in serious denial about the reasons for the oppositions loss and still thinks that the voters are sleepwalking – even mentioned the “extended honeymoon”.

  5. Re the alcopops legislation, the Senator grabbing the limelight is none other than Fielding who was elected with less than 2% of the primary vote.

    The sticking point is Senator Fielding, who recently reversed his initial support for the tax. He wants a curb on alcohol advertising during sporting matches and health warnings on alcohol. Senator Fielding did not return The Australian’s calls yesterday.

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25191741-5013871,00.html

    So Fielding was in ‘support’ but now tries to be more hairy chested than Nick Xenophon who seems to be more sympathetic:

    Yesterday, Senator Xenophon indicated he was inclined to pass the bill, despite some reservations.

    Again the Opposition has picked the wrong issue on which to fight, particularly given the expert opinion.

    a statement by the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Alcohol Advisory Group published on the Medical Journal of Australia’s website, endorsing the tax.

    “The evidence to date is that the alcopops tax is a step in the right direction,” the statement said

    Do es the electorate really want to see $290 million returned to the distillers and importers? Another potential trigger?

  6. anyone catch Abbott last night on Lateline?

    Sure did! He has become an arrogant joke and Turnbull must despair at his inability to impose some form of discipline and develop a coherent strategic approach. Like trying to herd feral cats.

    Of course it could simply be the case he is riding shot-gun for Tip and it’s just part of the plot to drive Malcolm mad,

    Those whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad

  7. Even more bullcrap from this link

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25194021-12332,00.html

    “The global recession meant it was more important than ever for the Government to work with educators to ensure “that the quality of the international student experience both on- and off-campus matches the quality of the learning they receive.”

    hay leftoids do you people care that Showpony, daffy duck and the communist are selling out our country???

  8. Actually, I think alot of the electorate wouldn’t give a toss about who gets $290 million dollars so long as they can get their cheap alcohol. Don’t underestimate the power of catering to people who don’t understand the big picture. It has worked for the Republicans in the USA for a long time (they have worked the Bible Belt to great success).

  9. @Neil of Sydney:
    Dude, stick to the subject. We’re talking about legislation that may be a double dissolution trigger for the government. Namely the alcopops & political donations legislation.

  10. Dude, stick to the subject. We’re talking about legislation that may be a double dissolution trigger for the government. Namely the alcopops & political donations legislation”

    Listen mate all I saw was the title “Federal legislation”

    You obviously do not care that now Australian scientists have to compete with the rest of the world for jobs in the country they were born and raised.

    read it and weep

    The link again

    “Unis to chase overseas research talent”

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25194021-12332,00.html

    Leftoids you can all go and get stuffed

  11. Thanks for the link Neil. But I didn’t think you were in the business of highlighting good news for Labor. From your link.

    The overseas student industry supported 80,000 Australian jobs and as the country’s biggest service export sector pumped $14.2 billion into the economy in 2007-08

    $14.2 billion in income. Supports 80 000 Australian jobs. Perhaps a goodly number of those PhDs your so concerned about.

    Enrolments by overseas students in Australian institutions increased by a record 20.7 per cent to 543,898 in 2008 – the largest increase since 2002 – according to the latest Australian Education International figures.

    A 20.7% increase in one year. Unbelievable! Certainly an achievement Rudd will wear with pride. More evidence of the success of the ‘Education Revolution’.

    Keep up the good work Neil, but don’t be shy, admit your an ALP plant.

  12. Leftoids you can all go and get stuffed

    Neil, don’t ever let anyone chase you out of here. We need people like you, keeping it real.

    (Oh yeah, and you make me laugh.)

  13. Keep up the good work Neil, but don’t be shy, admit your an ALP plant.”

    It is news to me that in 14 months that the ALP has created 80,00 jobs because of their education policies.

    The link i provided was a new ALP policy you leftoid braindead ALP supporter.

    For some strange reason the ALP wants to import foreign scientists into Australia into an area where there is no skills shortage. In fact we have PhD’s in this country who cannot get jobs in research but have to become sales reps walking around selling scientifict products while Russian, poles, chinese do the research while us Aussies sell products or pick a different career. Lots of cabies have PhD’s. however the Russians, poles, Chinese will not do something like this

  14. Neil of Sydney, on March 17th, 2009 at 9:51 am Whats wrong with our own kids??? We have people with PhD’s in this country who cannot get jobs in research and have to pick different careers.

    A big bit of the problem is huge lack of funding to universities. Youngest is at UQ with only 1 year to go for her PhD in Molecular Bioscience and you would not believe the amount of time wasted just in applications to ensure funding for the following year. To my knowledge there isn’t even any guarantee that our kids can even complete their PhDs should the uni’s faculty fail to achieve funding.

  15. Apologies. The first part was a quote from Neil, the following paragraph was me.

  16. @Neil of Sydney:

    Listen mate all I saw was the title “Federal legislation”

    Ah, so actually reading what the thread was about before going on an anit-Labour nut-job rant was too much effort? Makes sense… from a certifiable point of view *laugh*

    You obviously do not care that now Australian scientists have to compete with the rest of the world for jobs in the country they were born and raised.

    I most certainly do care about it. My education background is Electrical Engineering, a hard job to get here in Australia as it is cheaper to get an equivalently qualified company to do it overseas. I have four smart children that will need to make their way in this country as well.

    That said, this is a thread on the legislation being rejected by the senate and providing double dissolution triggers for our government. I’d freely engage you in discussion on this in an appropriate thread, but you are simply trying to distract attention away from the Liberals opposing good legislation by throwing any mud you can find on Labour.

  17. Neil re

    For some strange reason the ALP wants to import foreign scientists into Australia into an area where there is no skills shortage.

    From: http://www.alp.org.au/media/0309/msimmc160.php

    The changes to the program are:

    A 14 per cent cut in the 2008-09 permanent skilled migration program intake from 133 500 to 115 000.
    Removing building and manufacturing trades from the Critical Skills List, such as bricklayers, plumbers, welders, carpenters and metal fitters. The list will now comprise mainly health and medical, engineering and IT professions.

    I would suggest Neil that health, medical, engineering and ITs are not necessarily the PhD graduates that you mention who are struggling to find placements.

    I should imagine that there are not a huge number of doctors and dentists driving cabs. In fact I would suggest that indeed Australia is struggling to find enough orthodontic, orthopaedic and other surgeons.

    Of course we should be training our own, but until we do there is a skills shortage.

  18. trying to distract attention away from the Liberals opposing good legislation by throwing any mud you can find on Labour.
    B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:15 am Said:

    Listen mate this is mud worth throwing. And i do not care on what thread. As for being anti-Labor – you got it mate. a totally useless politically party whose only purpose in life is to sell out Australia.

    how about making some comments about what Dillard said

    “AUSTRALIA is formally entering the global talent wars, unveiling a plan to recruit the best and brightest university-age students from overseas.”

    “In particular I would like to stress the economic and educational benefits that flow from increasing the proportion of international research students in the tertiary sector,” the Deputy Prime Minister told an education conference. ”

    “They become both the source and conduit of the new knowledge, ideas and technologies that Australia will continue to need, if we are to meet the local and global challenges that lay ahead,” she said”

    At this link

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25194021-12332,00.html

    Any comments braindead ALP leftoid?????

  19. Go and shave your palms, Neil.

  20. Any comments braindead ALP leftoid?????

    Yeah. You’re hopelessly deluded.

    I’m voting to get rid of Labour in NSW when I get the chance. The ones leading the State govet are a bunch of power-hungry crooks and deserve to be turfed on their rear-end. If the Liberal Party in NSW didn’t have a fundamentalist whack-job (who makes for a scary image in budgie smugglers) as a leader last time round – the current mob wouldn’t have won.

    I vote for the policies put forward and the ability of the party to make them a reality when I go to the ballot box. Unlike you, I am not defined by my allegiance or loathing of any particular party, but by the policies they implement.

    @Everyone Else:
    Now I’m done feeding the troll, what do others think of the government’s chances of using the electoral donations legislation as a double dissolution trigger?

  21. It is news to me that in 14 months that the ALP has created 80,00 jobs because of their education policies.

    Clearly Neil you have a comprehension problem. LOL. Certainly not a PhD student, now or in the future.

    As for ‘braindead’, I’ll others decide who suffers from the tendency. And the evidence is all your own work. LOL.

    But back to the post.

    Senator Melham has been taunting the Fundy with historical references.

    DARYL MELHAM: The sad fact of the matter, Madam Deputy Speaker, is that we have a modern day Albert Field in the Parliament, in the Senate

    And yes Tom, Albert Field was from Queensland courtesy of Joh. He replaced Vince when he headed off to Ireland.

    DARYL MELHAM: But what mandate does Senator Fielding have?

    Senator Fielding in 2004, Madam Deputy Speaker, got 55,551 votes out of state-wide vote in Victoria, of 2,996,594 votes. So he had 1.8 per cent of the vote and in effect, he got himself elected, Madam Deputy Speaker, on the back of the Labor Party’s preferences.

    I’m saying to you Madam Deputy Speaker that he does not have a mandate to frustrate the Labor Party at every opportunity in relation to every piece of legislation.

    Telling it as it is might be good for the soul but is not necessarily good politics.

    http://www.abc.net.au/pm/content/2008/s2517653.htm

  22. Now I’m done feeding the troll,
    B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:36 am Said:

    Mate what a great comment. Too cowardly to address my comments. What about this comment by Dillard

    “With Australia’s research workforce facing intense skills shortages, Julia Gillard said Australia would upgrade its recruitment of overseas students to aid the country’s research efforts.”

    Any comments brain dead arsehole????

    It is news to me that our research community suffers from a skills shortage

  23. N5 – DARYL MELHAM – “So he had 1.8 per cent of the vote and in effect, he got himself elected, ”

    So Fielding had 1.8% of the national vote? But only 1.25% of the Senate seats!!

    He’s under represented!

    Poor Daryl, never good with numbers.

  24. B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:36 am Said:

    chances of using the electoral donations legislation as a double dissolution trigger?

    Rudd doesn’t want a DD anytime soon. The electorate tends to punish those who go ‘early’ as is evidenced by the experiences in NT, WA and now QLD. Nevertheless, it’s always good to have a few triggers up your sleeve.

    The issue won’t generate a ‘fire’ but it will be useful to throw on a ‘fire’ if and when the need arises.

  25. Woops, my mistake.

  26. Leftoids you can all go and get stuffed

    The link i provided was a new ALP policy you leftoid braindead ALP supporter.

    You’re on the wrong thread neil, refer to the one entitled – ‘Bloghomie Spells The End of Blogs’, you’re allowed to vent there.

  27. I’m saying to you Madam Deputy Speaker that he does not have a mandate to frustrate the Labor Party at every opportunity in relation to every piece of legislation.

    I agree with that and hope that Fundies First Fielding (Mr. 1.77%) will be gone at the next election.

    Some of the issues that he votes down are clearly not in the interests of his own ‘fundies’ platform. Why does Senator Fielding want young girls to be binge drinking?

  28. What I meant to point out earlier was that nationwide – the Family First Party received 1.62% of the primary vote in the Senate, but only 1.25% of the Senate seats.

    They are in fact under represented.

    Daryl Melham would be wise to have a go at the members of his party that did the preference deal, rather than complain about the outcome of it.

  29. Re the Alcopops part of joni’s topic. I was interested to listen to Fielding’s reasoning. That higher taxes on these would deprive middle class mums of a cheap drink.

  30. Daryl Melham would be wise to have a go at the members of his party that did the preference deal, rather than complain about the outcome of it.

    It’s these preference deals that seem to make a mockery of a genuine democracy isn’t it? That’s what I’ve got against it, Fielding’s presence doesn’t reflect the will of the people.

    Above or below the line? Managing preference votes (Antony Green)

    A democratic deficit has developed, with serious questions as to whether the results engineered by group ticket voting truly represent the will of the electorate.

    The democratic deficit is clear when you look at the choices faced by voters. Group ticket voting produces the ridiculous situation where voters are forced to choose between voting above the line for a party ticket they don’t know, can’t find out about and probably wouldn’t understand if they could, or to vote below the line giving preferences to a vast array of candidates they don’t know and don’t care about just to have their vote count for the smaller number of candidates they do know.

  31. Sorry, I forgot to place quote marks around my quoting of tom In the first para.

  32. Re the Alcopops part of joni’s topic. I was interested to listen to Fielding’s reasoning. That higher taxes on these would deprive middle class mums of a cheap drink.

    And make life so much easier for middle class men? 🙂
    Mother’s little helper has become an alcopop.

    But doesn’t the research say it is the teenage girls who are binge drinking on the alcopops, didn’t hear anything about middle class mums.

  33. Yes Kittylitter, I do agree with that point about the voting system.

    I think I’m probably voting informal these days. There have been occasions during recent history where I’ve put ALP and Liberal equal second last.

    My Senate vote is fairly complicated too.

    I doubt whether it is counted.

  34. And I do not think the senate is going to ask for the tax collected to be given back, just that the tax will be removed from now on.

  35. My Senate vote is fairly complicated too.

    Mine too, I refuse to vote above the line and end up getting in a big mess after I lose my place in the huge numbering system.

  36. Kitty..this is most certainly where Fielding doesn’t get it.

    The argument has been that an extra $1 will send teenage girls onto harder drink, that teenage girls will start mixing their own.

    Imagine that, visualise schoolies week on the Cold Ghost or at Byron and teen girls are going to be carrying around with them a bottle of vodka, 6 glasses and 2 bottles of a mixer so that they can mix their own in inappropriate amounts.

    Fielding needs to levitate himself out of his cloistered environment and realise that the alcohol of choice for teenage girls is alcopops.

  37. Neil

    You never fail to amuse me with your hysterical rantings about leftoid loonies, when it appears you are the classic example of an extremist who has no capacity to make an educated decision based on facts from both sides of the political spectrum.

  38. Thank you reb. This is where I am thinking that Fielding isn’t living in the same world as the rest of us, nor does he appreciate the goin’s on. Just ban advertising of alcohol during sports events? I wonder if Fielding realises who sponsors major sporting events?

    Very very obviously this is a worthy aim but it has to be a gradual phasing out while other sponsors are found.

  39. Has any moderator noticed the abuse that Neil of Sydney has been hurling at anyone who disagrees with him? I find it to be totally beneath the spirit of this blog.

    Interesting post. I don’t think they’ll have a DD on alcopops. It’s interesting that the cressbench senators are muscling up to the government. That’ll keep the government on their toes. It’ll also be interesting to see how the Fair Work Bill and the Emissions Trading Scheme work out. I see those as other possible Double Dissolution Triggers.

    As mentioned in the post, the Political Donations could possibly be used as a trigger. Can the Coalition and Senator Fielding give any decent reason why that legislation is not a massive improvement in political accountability, and therefore explain why they voted against it?

    MODERATOR: Hi Alastair, yes, we’re all familiar with Neil of Sydney’s “style”. Let’s just say that it does little to support his argument. We let him get away with it, because, well, it just makes him look ridiculous…

  40. Alastair

    Yes – we have noticed, but I think it classifies as pure trolling and can be taken in jest.

  41. Moderator!! I think Neil makes an articulate and well reasoned contribution.

    Rational, focussed and informed, spiced up with some well targeted personal abuse. There should be more of it.

    MODERATOR: Agreed. There should be more of it. Targeted personal abuse is hard to find these days. It’s the ‘untargeted’ generalised ‘leftoid’ remarks that are just so tiresome and commonplace.

  42. @Tom of Melbourne:
    In the off chance you are not speaking tongue in cheek, I totally disagree with you. His is not rational, he may be focussed (but on the wrong subjects due to not being able to “win” this one), and given he doesn’t even read beyond the thread title (by his own admission) – I highly doubt “informed” is on the list of attributes I’d be giving the guy.

    On the other hand, personal abuse does seem to be his thing.

  43. Min, on March 17th, 2009 at 3:00 pm

    The garbage from Xenophobe and Feelgood are the reason most of us DON’T vote for independents (although I often think they are dependent on something…). The concept of Independent Representatives is a good one, unfortunately, they all seem to be, well. for want of a better word “wankers”…

    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 4:15 pm

    BT, I’m afraid, Tom, he speak with forked tongue and has fork ( 😆 ) in each cheek!

  44. Thanks TB, I was hoping so but whilst Tom is much more eloquent, he and Neil are often batting for the same team 🙂

    On the idea of “Independent Representatives”, I don’t think that is the issue at all. If we actually had representatives that fought for their area (like they are supposed to) rather than an ideal – the system would work.

    Instead what we have are two large parties fighting for somewhat vague (but mostly left/right based) ideals, one super left party used as an “up yours” vote against the big two, and two senators elected on singular concepts (anti-gambling and Christian fundamentalism). The USA has quite a few things wrong but they at least have senators that go above and beyond for their constituents (witness the Ted Stevens debacle!)

  45. B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 6:13 pm

    Yeah, BT, I know its difficult, Neil is just a dickwit and Tom is such a – mmmm… dickwit…

    Not sure the US is a prime example of democracy at work…

    My point was that the principle is often a long way from the fact…as we are seeing independents are often media tarts at our expense – they actually hold up reform and governments on issues/platforms they were not elected on – that is not constituent representation…

    …and as I write (and think – I am part woman, y’know) I don’t think it is appropriate in any way to compare the US system with ours…mindset is quite different…

  46. my post just disappeared, BT?

  47. Having the Senate as a house of review is fine, provided the “reviewing” is being done by people with a few neurons to rub together.

    Don Chipp in his day was a master of “review”, ladling it-out un buckets to several successive Governments. On the other hand, the Democrats did eventually rather drop the baton somewhat. Had they stuck to the main game and not prostituted themselves, Howard might never have obtained his Senate Majority in 2004.

    You will recall that this was the majority that finally permitted him pass his Great Social Experiment, WorkChoices. And didn’t that work-out well for the Liberals in 2007?

    It killed them. Had it not been for that particular disaster, they might well have retained so to speak.

    However, having a couple of fringe-dwellers (like an anti-gambling crusader and a religious born-again nut-job) holding the balance of power in the Senate is quite another thing.

    This alcopops deal just shows the sort of nonsense that can and will occurr.

    This sort of micro-management of Government decisionmaking is absurd and a continuation of it will make the place ungovernable. What’s next? Will Fielding insist on the Lord’s Prayer being recited in every Primary and Secondary School daily before he’ll pass the budget?

    You get my drift.

  48. Oops. I meant to say:
    “It killed them. Had it not been for that particular disaster, they might well have retained power so to speak.”

  49. Evan, on March 17th, 2009 at 7:17 pm Said

    the Lord’s Prayer being recited in every Primary and Secondary School daily

    Fielding thinks that’s what happens already. Don’t disturb the Lotus Eater from his slumber. And above all don’t given him ideas, which might seem ridiculous to an intelligent person, but which resonate with a Fundamentalist.

  50. “as we are seeing independents are often media tarts at our expense – they actually hold up reform and governments on issues/platforms they were not elected on – that is not constituent representation…”

    Unrepresentative swill…:)
    N’

  51. One young lass gets killed driving after drinking alcopops…and Fielding will look like “Family Last”.

    N’

  52. nasking, on March 17th, 2009 at 7:37 pm Said:

    One young lass gets killed driving after drinking alcopops…and Fielding will look like “Family Last”.

    No naskin, that would be god’s will!

    When you are a Fundy you have an answer for all problems, political or otherwise.

  53. Evan – “On the other hand, the Democrats did eventually rather drop the baton somewhat. Had they stuck to the main game and not prostituted themselves, Howard might never have obtained his Senate Majority in 2004.”

    Please explain exactly what the “prostitution” was.

  54. “When you are a Fundy you have an answer for all problems, political or otherwise.”

    True…but I don’t think a media on the hunt for stories, ads & moolah is gonna worry about “God’s Will”…using Fielding as a whack-a-mole might come in very handy for the cash-strapped.
    N’

  55. Yeah, BT, I know its difficult, Neil is just a dickwit
    TB Queensland, on March 17th, 2009 at 6:30 pm Said:”

    TB -really great comment. Personal abuse is all you can do with someone you do not agree with.

    How about a comment on this
    “With Australia’s research workforce facing intense skills shortages, Julia Gillard said Australia would upgrade its recruitment of overseas students to aid the country’s research efforts. ”

    Research jobs in Australia funded by the Australian govt are now going to be advertised o/s. Dillard wants to attract talented people from O/S to compete with our own kids.

    We have no skills shortages in research. We do have people with PhD’s who cannot get a job in research

  56. Neil,

    Do the student from overseas pay money to study here? And does that money actually help the universities to keep their fees down for local students? You know, the universities that had funding cut during the term of the last government.

  57. @TB:
    *laugh* I may disagree with Tom of Melbourne… well, almost all the time; but he is not the dick-wit that Neil proves himself to be again & again.

    @joni:
    I agree with you, I really do, but you’re falling into Neil’s game. There is no way for Liberal’s to look good in the subject above (alcopops & political donations are simply to black & white); so Neil is changing the subject. Ignore the troll… or, if you must – create a new post on the subject of the “Education Revolution” and move his bile there.

  58. You know, the universities that had funding cut during the term of the last government
    joni, on March 17th, 2009 at 8:34 pm Said”

    Assuming you are correct- funding was cut because the Federal govt had a deficit and was in debt. For the millionth time, you know, the $96B debt left by the ALP. Heard about this???

    Dillard is talking about increasing the number of qualified people with degrees coming here if I have read her comments correctly

    “With Australia’s research workforce facing intense skills shortages, Julia Gillard said Australia would upgrade its recruitment of overseas students to aid the country’s research efforts. ”

    This is something new. Why increase researchers coming to Australia when there are not enough jobs for our own people???

    Why increase the number??? Furthermore we do not have a skills shortage in research in this country. So Dillard is telling lies. Why is she doing this???

  59. Neil

    Ah yes – the $96 Billion debt mantra. Do you ever mention the debt that Howard left the ALP? And what about the transfer of debt from the government to the private sector? Remember the debt truck?

    And note the word “students”. Foreign students pay to attend universities. Universities need money.

    So why is she telling lies? Where is the evidence that we have a “skills shortage in research in this country”? Can you point us to the evidence?

  60. BT

    Yes – I might put up an education revolution thread….

  61. so Neil is changing the subject.
    B.Tolputt, on March 17th, 2009 at 8:47 pm Said:”

    I saw the title ‘Federal Legislation” and I posted. i have seen this policy by the ALP before. They want to advertise jobs in Australian research overseas. This is totally immoral.

    Furthermore nobody cares. if someone like me brings up the issue I am called a troll.

    “And note the word “students”. Foreign students pay to attend universities. Universities need money.”
    joni, on March 17th, 2009 at 8:59 pm Said:

    People doing PhD’s are called students. Dillards wants to bring these people here

    “Where is the evidence that we have a “skills shortage in research in this country”?”
    Joni

    I finally agree with something you say. Where is the evidence??? We do not have a skills shortage in research in Australia. We do have people in this country with PhD’s who cannot get a job.

    Who knows even people like MIns daughter. We do not want foreign scientists coming here because there are not enough jobs to employ our own people

  62. Neil

    I mis-posted (trying to eat dinner). I meant – where is the evidence that we do not have enough jobs for scientists?

    And those doig PHD’s pay fees. And that is what the universities need.

  63. I meant – where is the evidence that we do not have enough jobs for scientists?
    Joni”

    Go and ask Min. She says her youngest is doing a PhD.

    Min what does your youngest say about foreign scientists coming to Australia???

    Do we have a skills shortage in research like Dillard says???

  64. I wouldn’t worry if I were you, Neil. Highly-educated types aren’t likely to be conservative supporters anyway.

  65. My cousin has a PhD, Neil, – in Medieval Languages. Lots of employment opportunities with that one.

    You seem to be assuming that all PhDs are in technical fields.

  66. My cousin has a PhD, Neil, – in Medieval Languages. Lots of employment opportunities with that one.
    Sans Blog, on March 17th, 2009 at 9:53 pm Said”

    Got any evidence for this bulldust??? The only employment opportunities for employment in medieval languages would be as a University lecturer. There are usually 300 applicants for every lecturer job advertised.

    I would like some evidence not your personal opinion.

  67. I think we all should adopt Neil’s sage advice, completely ignore any cross-fertilisation of ideas, banish the Other no matter how relevant their highly specialist or even unique skills might be, and swap in some moonlighting taxi-driver like a lightbulb, because it’s not like research is ever applied to the real world, generates any new fields of knowledge, or even becomes commercialised or a nette job creator outside research.

  68. I wouldn’t worry if I were you, Neil. Highly-educated types aren’t likely to be conservative supporters anyway.
    Caney, on March 17th, 2009 at 9:50 pm Said:”

    If only dumbasses support the Libs and only highly educated people support the ALP, how come you are an ALP supporter????

  69. MODERATOR: Hi Alastair, yes, we’re all familiar with Neil of Sydney’s “style”. Let’s just say that it does little to support his argument. We let him get away with it, because, well, it just makes him look ridiculous…

    He needs no support in order to look ridiculous. He is doing quite nicely under his own steam.

    I learnt at uni that the Neanderthal had been extinct for 60,000 years. Not so. There’s one living in Sydney. The mere mutterance of words like “ALP”, “Rudd”, “Gillard” presses the ‘must act like idiot’ button in his Neanderlithic brain. When he’s not swinging in a tree he’s drooling over the keyboard grunting little threats to those who oppose his masculinity.

    Neil, you are an anthropologists delight. I’m packing my clipboard and tape recorder and coming to Sydney.

  70. Neil of Sydney, on March 17th, 2009 at 10:11 pm

    You really are a glutton for punishment. LOL.

    One can only assume you are young and stupid. But perhaps it’s in the genes and the condition is unlikely to improve over time?

    The evidence to date suggests it’s … whatever.

  71. Neil, you are an anthropologists delight. I’m packing my clipboard and tape recorder and coming to Sydney.
    Miglo, on March 17th, 2009 at 10:35 pm Said:”

    hay Miglo how about responding to my comments. I have noticed that personal abuse is a leftoid speciality.

    Dillard is about to make available research jobs in this country when we have no skills shortage. We may have a shortage of Doctors but these people are not researchers.

    Furthermore your post was a complete waste of time. You must have been drunk when you wrote it. Being a leftoid you most probably think you are superior to me and all other people.

  72. Nature 5, I’m actually compiling a personality profile on Neil.

    One word stands out: Oddity. Nothing like the Elephant Man, but more like Pol Pot.

  73. Being a leftoid you most probably think you are superior to me and all other people.

    No. Only you.

    Furthermore your post was a complete waste of time.

    On the contrary, I’m sure that everbody else enjoyed it.

    hay Miglo how about responding to my comments. I have noticed that personal abuse is a leftoid speciality.

    You really are a dickhead aren’t you Neil. I came onto this thread and all I saw was abuse to all and sundry from you. And respond to your comments! Get real. They don’t deserve a response. They only deserve ridicule.

  74. Neil of Sydney, on March 17th, 2009 at 10:41 pm

    Try to imagine that ‘research’ has both a qualitative and a quantitative dimension to the exercise; it’s not just that the ‘job’ gets done, it’s how well it’s done; and how well it gets done, often-times, determines both a broadening quantitative scope for further researches and an ever-narrowing scope for researchers with relevant qualitative skills.

  75. Neil, you’ve answered your own question. Shave your palms and cry on the execrable Bolt’s shoulder. Spittle-flecked hysteria and a complete lack of reasoned debate is his stock in trade, so you’d feel quite at home, I suspect.

    Less ranting and foaming at the mouth would attract far less ridicule, as would actually addressing the issues raised on the thread.

    Get over it-Rodentopia has vanished into the ether, where hopefully it will remain, only to be resurrected like the bogey man to frighten kids.

  76. They don’t deserve a response. They only deserve ridicule.
    Miglo, on March 17th, 2009 at 10:49 pm Said:”

    From the leftoids only personal abuse as usual. You obviously think that advertising Australian jobs around the world is a joke. We have nice kids in this country who come out of Uni with huge HECS debts and they now find they have to compete with research jobs in this country with the rest of the world thanks to the ALP.

    As for your opinion of me, it is a great honour to be abused by you. I would be really upset if someone like you agreed with my opinions

  77. Hello Jane. Nice to see you again.

  78. What’s got my ire up is all this “dog whistling” related to China during this QLD election.

    There can’t be any coincidence that Hanson rises from the dance floor ashes…grabs as much attention as possible whilst her very mug reminds voters of Asia-related comments.

    And Barnaby JOYLESS farts on about the dreaded dragon coming to buy into our “sovereign wealth”…

    Oh, what would we do w/out the dog whistlers of Australian politics?:

    Dog-whistle politics, also known as the use of code words, is a type of political campaigning or speechmaking employing coded language that appears to mean one thing to the general population but has a different or more specific meaning for a targeted subgroup of the audience. The term is usually used pejoratively by those that do not approve of the tactics.

    I guess they weren’t too worried about the Chinese when the exports were being churned out tho…when the Neo-Libs & their CONservative Nat mates were in the driver’s seat chewing up the land, making billions…begging for cheap, toxic goods to be manufactured there & returned to sender. Anything to keep the greasy wheels of capitalism turning, the unemployment & inflation figures down…the profiteers of the Coalition happy as a sprouting Howard eyebrow on post-election eve.

    But now, as the Coalition leaders sit on the sidelines watching the world go by w/out them…they jeer…& call on their puppets to sabotage…at any cost. Calling out:

    “Whistle Pauline…whistle Barnaby…whistle like your bank balance depends on it!!!”
    N’

  79. Neil, I’m off to listen to Plillip Adams for a while.

    Boy, that would mean that I’ve listened to individuals from both ends of the evolutionary scale tonight. Adams with his intellectual dialogue and you with your grunts.

    And I did have a huge HECS debt. I found a job. I paid it off.

    And these ‘nice kids’ won’t have a HECS debt, as according to you, they won’t get a job. You only have to start paying your debt when you start earning an income.

    And just to really get up your nose, guess what I do? I review legislation.

  80. Hell N’. You’re here for the circus too I imagine.

  81. Neil doesn’t seem to understand the difference between a student, who pays money to a university, and an employee, to whom a university pays money.

    Once one grasps the distinction, of course, his argument is revealed as pointless nonsense. Now there’s a surprise.

  82. And just to really get up your nose, guess what I do? I review legislation.
    Miglo, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:04 pm Said:”

    Good. Then what is your opinion of this new policy of advertising for research jobs in this country overseas???

    We do not have a skills shortage in this country regarding research jobs.

    “And these ‘nice kids’ won’t have a HECS debt, as according to you, they won’t get a job.”

    NO I DIDN”T SAY THAT. They will find a job, cleaning floors, toilets, driving cabs and whatever. Thats what Aussies do. If they cannot find a job they are trained for they will do something else.

    But if you have a PhD you want to do research in the country you were born and raised. They will have to find another job and do something they were not initially trained for while Russians, Poles, Chinese and whatever and do the highly paid interesting research jobs. They come here with no HECS debt and demand that the Australian govt gives them a highly paid research job while people born here pick a different career.

    This is immoral

  83. Neil they are not research JOBS. They are research STUDENT PLACES. Is the distinction really so hard to comprehend?

  84. I love Neil’s new direction. Now they are coming here and demanding the highly paid research jobs.

  85. The irony of a Liberal calling something immoral.

  86. Neil they are not research JOBS. They are research STUDENT PLACES. Is the distinction really so hard to comprehend?
    Ken Lovell, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:28 pm Said:

    No it is not hard to comprehend. A student is someone doing a Bachelors degree. A research student is someone doing a PhD. We do not need any more PhD’s in this country. We have enough.

  87. But Neil – they are students who are paying money to finish their PhD.

    Do you not understand that?

  88. Do you not understand that?
    joni, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:36 pm Said:”

    Yes I do and Dillard wants to increase the number. This is immoral.

    “Unis to chase overseas research talent”

    “With Australia’s research workforce facing intense skills shortages, Julia Gillard said Australia would upgrade its recruitment of overseas students to aid the country’s research efforts”

    Bulldust. We may have a shortage of doctors but we do not have a shortage of researchers. in fact we have many unemployed researchers

    “In a marked departure from past education ministers, Ms Gillard said research scholars would help build Australia’s future research capability and academic workforce.”

    “In a marked departure”- understand that leftoids??? This is something new.

    A MARKED DEPARTURE

    How stupid are you people

  89. ‘A research student is someone doing a PhD.’

    No, it’s someone doing a research higher degree, which includes but is not limited to PhDs. But since you appear to grasp the basic point, why do you insist in calling them research JOBS when they are nothing of the sort?

    To classify as a JOB, someone needs to have an employer and get paid a wage. Research STUDENTS meet neither criterion.

    International students come here on student visas, pay lots of money to Australian organisations, and then go back home again. Nothing you have ranted about in this thread is remotely relevant to this practice.

  90. But since you appear to grasp the basic point, why do you insist in calling them research JOBS when they are nothing of the sort?
    Ken Lovell, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:51 pm Said:”

    Well O.K. but when they finish their PhD they will want a job. they will not go home. The ALP is going to increase the number of these people. Why?? It sounds like they want to outsource everything.

    Furthermore the ALP abolished the Federation fellowship Scheme which was used to attract Australian scientists working O/S home. they have replaced it with a scheme open to anybody on the planet. Australian funded jobs available to anyone on the planet

  91. ‘Well O.K. but when they finish their PhD they will want a job. they will not go home.’

    They will have no choice in the matter. Under the terms of their temporary visas they have to go back home. If they fail to do so they will be deported.

  92. They will have no choice in the matter. Under the terms of their temporary visas they have to go back home. If they fail to do so they will be deported.
    Ken Lovell, on March 18th, 2009 at 12:11 am Said:”

    You obviously didn’t read the article

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25194021-12332,00.html

    “In a marked departure from past education ministers, Ms Gillard said research scholars would help build Australia’s future research capability and academic workforce.””

    Academic workforce– hello!!!!!!

    A MARKED DEPARTURE

    FUTURE RESEARCH CAPABILITY

    They are not going home

  93. Neil you clearly know absolutely nothing about either our immigration regulations or universities.

    Good night.

  94. Neil, did you miss this bit from the article you linked to?

    The overseas student industry supported 80,000 Australian jobs and as the country’s biggest service export sector pumped $14.2 billion into the economy in 2007-08, Ms Gillard told the Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations roundtable on international education today.

    Enrolments by overseas students in Australian institutions increased by a record 20.7 per cent to 543,898 in 2008 – the largest increase since 2002 – according to the latest Australian Education International figures.

    A personal example – a friend of my son is coming to Australia to study (at Masters level) next year. The tuition fees will be about $40,000 – that’s money coming into that tertiary institution from overseas, surely a good thing?

    Also this bit:

    Ms Gillard’s comments follow recent predictions that US universities will increase their recruitment of the best overseas students to shore up the US’s technological edge, and persistent questions over whether Australia recruits as many of the very best students it can.

    How many of our best and brightest post-graduate students are being poached by the US?

  95. Neil, did you miss this bit from the article you linked to?
    bacchus, on March 18th, 2009 at 12:55 am Said:”

    You obviously did not see my comment at 11.06AM

    “It is news to me that in 14 months that the ALP has created 80,00 jobs because of their education policies.”

    The ALP is talking about increasing the number of research students to “help” increase our research capabilities and academic workforce to the detrement of people born and raised here.

    Looks like they want too outsource our research while people born and raised here drive cabs

  96. You really aren’t too bright, are you Neil? The article doesn’t say anything about creating 80,000 jobs, it says “the overseas student industry supported 80,000 Australian jobs”. These people come here for a year or two, they need accommodation, they eat, travel, shop, etc.

    They “pumped $14.2 billion into the economy in 2007-08”. You’d like to see this money stripped from the nation’s income on top of the drop in income from China not buying as much of what we dig out of the ground?

    Your cab drivers are not being displaced by overseas students – those with post-graduate qualifications are only involved in university research if they’re running it, not filling the roles these students do.

    Australian born & bred STUDENTS are filling the same roles as the overseas STUDENTS but there are not enough of either of these groups, which does NOT include those who have already completed their study. Understand?

    The other point you seem to be missing is that this is an international concern – US, European and Asian universities compete world-wide for the best & brightest students – I remember one of the professors when I was at uni recruiting for US universities.

  97. How long does Steve Fielding think he can take this country for a ride?

    ” However, last night the Government offered him specific concessions to tighten government oversight of the advertising code, including making adherence to the code mandatory instead of voluntary.”
    (Canberra Times.

    Now if he votes the bill down today after such concessions it seems obvious to me that he is not bona-fide. Why scuttle all the compromises & concessions made by the government to date?

    Is he really just an economic SABOTEUR offering vague solutions in order to look like a saviour? A wolf in sheep’s clothing?

    If that money is returned to the distillers there will be HELL to pay.
    N’

  98. nasking, on March 17th, 2009 at 11:04 pm

    It’s interesting, really. There was Barnaby trying to explain vertical integration to the tv masses, while one mass occupying the couch at the time was thinking that the bulk of exports from China derive from vertically integrated foreign corporations. I guess the only thing that can be said for Barnaby is that if ‘privatising gains, socialising losses’ isn’t the ideology of choice, there’s always ‘privatising gains, nationalising losses’ to fall back on when the farm has been bet and lost in a grand wager at arm’s length. Still, one wonders if Barnaby can see any distinction between National Party interests and national interests, well before the FIRB-y has performed its oracular duties.

  99. I don’t like Barnaby Joyce…

    …I don’t like the idea of China buying into Rio Tinto…

    …as part owner of Rio, Chinalco becomes both seller and buyer of OUR mineral commodity…

    …although listed on the UK and Australian stock markets it is really controlled through London…

    …Rio Tinto is a “cowboy company” that has got itself into trouble – it needs to get itself out of trouble, with no help from Australia…

    …the mining of mineral deposits currently “owned” by Rio Tinto will provide income for Australia for many years into the future…

    …the sale of part of Rio Tinto to Chinalco will only serve to “muddy the waters” in future price negotiations between China and Australian companies for Australian commodities…

    …as Barnaby Joyce’s advert rightly says – Australia could never buy a Chinese mine…

    …free trade my arse…

  100. as Barnaby Joyce’s advert rightly says – Australia could never buy a Chinese mine

    And as Barnaby Joyce also says: We should sell the milk, not the cow.

  101. Apologies for the delay in replying..

    Re:

    Neil of Sydney, on March 17th, 2009 at 9:36 pm Said:
    I meant – where is the evidence that we do not have enough jobs for scientists?
    Joni”

    Go and ask Min. She says her youngest is doing a PhD.

    Min what does your youngest say about foreign scientists coming to Australia???

    Do we have a skills shortage in research like Dillard says??? ~~~

    The difficulty Neil is that there are not enough Australian students going on to do post-graduate studies. At daughter’s Honors graduation at UQ, at an estimate over 1/2 of the students would have been from overseas.

    A lot of this I believe is due to lack of support for Australian students bearing in mind that you cannot obtain Austudy until you turn 25yrs. There are just so many years one can spend trying to juggle study and the pizza run. To do a PhD, this is SEVEN YEARS study. Fortunately youngest was awarded a PhD scholarship as there is no way that she could have completed her PhD without this.

    A solution could be Austudy available for Australian students for Post-Graduate studies and not tied to how old the student is. Erin doesn’t turn 25 until this year, the final year of her PhD.

    Re foreign scientists coming to Australia. A very good number of PhD Supervisors (at least in science) are from overseas. Also many faculties work in conjunction with overseas scientists. For example, in my daughter’s area, they work in association with researchers in Germany. If you would like to have a look, Erin’s PhD Supervisor is Ben Hankamer (an American): http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?id=11700 And for anyone who caught it, they were my little girl’s algae on tellie a couple of months ago 🙂

    And a simple answer…yes we have a skills shortage due to so few Australians continuing study to post-graduate level. This obviously needs to be addressed as a matter of urgency as it takes a minimum of 7 years to train up a PhD graduate.

    However, in the interim we need to import expertise. An example could be nurses. These are part of science of course and those targetted to help address our skills shortage. One could say No more foreign nurses, but it will take at least 7 years to train up our own and in the interim we Australians can’t just ‘go without’.

  102. Tony

    I agree sell the milk not the cow.

    However one of the greatest offloader of our assets owned by Australia was the previous government. I wonder how much of QANTAS, The CBA and many other assets are owned by companies which are an offshoot of their governments.

    Barnaby Joyce should talk. Our farmers exported our cotton technology to China which now competes with us. Our farmers continue to export semen to other countries permitting those countries to build up their own herds from our far superior breeding stock after years of research and development. Those countries will then no longer need to purchase our produce.

    In addition those that move their businesses to China do so at their own peril. China is not a democracy and can freely take ownership of those businesses if it so chooses without compensation, ( refer Venezuela). I don’t think any of these businesses have thought along those lines when they pack up lock stock and barrel and move to China to simply cut wage costs.

  103. Neil

    I am anti outsourcing in many areas.

    But before throwing rocks at the current government in your typical one sided political rhetoric. You should see the horrific number of things which were outsourced and sold off under the previous federal government which you so lovingly adore.

    The ONLY thing they blocked was a Shell takeover of Woodside Petroluem and that was only after a public outcry at the loss of control of our energy resouces to a foreign owned company.

  104. Just listening to Fielding speak on the alcopop tax. Sounds to be half-sprung if you ask me.

  105. Shaneinqld – “However one of the greatest offloader of our assets owned by Australia was the previous government.”…Qantas

    Shane, you ought/should/do know that Qantas was sold in 1993, do you remember who was in government at that time??

    This was during the period of government prior to the previous government.

    You can’t simply blame the previous government for everything that bothers you.

  106. Tony, on March 18th, 2009 at 11:19 am

    You can’t fool me, Tony. I ‘know’ that a handful of magic beans is worth a goose that lays golden eggs in the long run, even if the purchase price is a cow and upsetting a poor widow. 😉

  107. We should sell the milk, not the cow.

    Does anyone know anything about royalty streams? Who is the ‘we’ in this parable? Aren’t the ‘we’ still selling the milk, only changing who gets the cream?

  108. Tom

    My apologies and correction regarding QANTAS you are totally correct it was sold off by the Keating Government. The bastards.

  109. Perhaps the new part-owners of the dairy will sell all the milk, cream, butter, cheese and yogurt, at whatever – low – price they like . After all, as the dairy’s biggest customer as well, they will be negotiating the deal with themselves.

    See any potential for conflict of interest, adverse to the owners of the farm?

  110. Tony, on March 18th, 2009 at 12:31 pm

    I can see all sorts of short-run, medium-run and longer-run implications, including a potentially barren cow yielding sour or no milk…which is why I’d tend to wait to see what the FIRB-y has to say, and not rely on a knee-jerker from Barnaby and like-minded ‘pastoralists’.

  111. Is it me or does someone else want a milkshake after all this moo-ing?

  112. Miglo, on March 17th, 2009 at 10:58 pm Said:

    Hello Jane. Nice to see you again.

    Thanx, migs. Go the Power!

  113. Hmmm:

    PRE-mixed drinks will be significantly cheaper within weeks after the government’s alcopop tax was defeated today.

    http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,25206284-661,00.html

  114. The Distilled Spirits Industry Council (DSICA) welcomed the Senate’s decision to reject the tax.

    (ABC on-line)

    N’

  115. Just a reminder:

    Fielding was born in Melbourne and educated at RMIT University, where he graduated in engineering, and at Monash University, where he gained an MBA. He worked as an engineer and a senior superannuation executive before entering politics. He was a member of the Knox City Council in 2003-04. Fielding is a member of CityLife Church, a large Pentecostal church in Melbourne.

    …Fielding’s vote has been important on some of the Howard government’s more controversial legislation. His vote ensured…the overturning of civil unions legislation in the Australian Capital Territory, and changes to media ownership laws.

    In February 2009, he told a Senate hearing that he believed divorce added to the impact of global warming because it resulted in people switching to a “resource-inefficient lifestyle”
    (Wiki pedia)

    hmmm…seems Fielding is working overtime for someone. He reckons it is God.
    N’

  116. I have no problem with the defeat of this bill. It is a tax bill dressed up as a solution to a social problem.

    If the government is genuinely concerned about underage drinking, then let’s see them make an effort to address its causes.

  117. And a simple answer…yes we have a skills shortage due to so few Australians continuing study to post-graduate level.
    Min, on March 18th, 2009 at 11:33 am Said:”

    Hi Min Thanks for you reply but I do not think this is true. Furthermore we have many talented people with PhD’s in this country who cannot get jobs in research and they are devastated.

    If we have a skills shortage your youngest should have no trouble getting a research job when she graduates. However i think she will struggle. This new ALP policy wants to increase the number of research students.

    I think it stinks

  118. Hey Tony,
    scaper just emailed my private mail(might as well come to my front door) and had the sense to tell me to fall into line as i do with the rest of the gang. i was just wondering how your email read and if he sent flowers.

    (you know im joking when i bring you up in this, don’t ya Tony).

    Iol, talk about over reacting.

  119. oops wrong blog

  120. Yeah Aqua,

    I know you’re joking, although I never had a problem with Scaper. In fact I blame owe him for getting me over here.

    (Why, did you get flowers?)

  121. should be blame

  122. flowers thing was a joke aswell.
    He got me here too and i always gave him time when he contacted me. But i told it how it was, i never joined in the attacks on his wife or project and to be put down like it did AND while i was drunk.

    he has very bad timing for raising issues and im offended.

    Tony i wish i submitted this in a more appropriate blog site than this one. (i blame him for getting you here too) 😉

  123. flowers thing was a joke aswell

    I knew that.

    (i blame him for getting you here too)

    And I hope that was too.

    😉

    (Oops, we better get off this thread. I see Reb coming – and he’s carrying a big moderating stick.)

  124. I’m not related to my namesake in Sydney. First time contributor. Nice blog.

    I’m confused with this alco-pop legislation. Has it been rejected once or twice?

    I though the Senate knocked it over a while ago. If so, doesn’t the government have a DD trigger now?

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