Flick Crit: Rachel Getting Married

The latest film review on Cinema Takes:

Rachel Getting Married: Uncomfortable in Connecticut

There’s nothing like a wedding to bring out the best and worst in families.

Rachel Getting Married, directed by Jonathan Demme, is set in upper middle class, comfortable Connecticut. Grinding poverty is not a factor in this family’s conflicts.

The drama centres on rehabilitation, not just of its central character, but of the whole family. Neuroses stalk the halls of the home that is the setting for the celebrations: sibling rivalry and jealousy, father/daughter, mother/daughter. More baggage than LA International Airport.

Kym is on leave from drug rehab to attend sister Rachel’s wedding to Sidney. Rachel is a high achiever par excellence, Ms Perfection. She is finishing her PhD in Psychology, arguably the worst possible background for dealing with a recovering sister. In fact all the family are guilty of over-analysis. All of them know the 12 steps of rehab by heart. Kym takes the one called “making amends’ to new territory in her speech to the pre-nuptial dinner. Echoes of many an embarrassing family moment on these public occasions for many in the audience.

Anne Hathaway as Kym is magnificent. Her striking appearance shifts between Liza Minnelli, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Keira Knightley and Audrey Tautou. Some company! She was too young for Twin Peaks but was made for it.

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2 Responses

  1. I liked this movie, it has everything I like in a drama, laughter, sorrow, tears, anger, in-fighting and a multi level, multi person storyline.

    The only thing missing is redemption it seems, because it left me feeling sad for Rachel ever being able to be healed. I don’t know how long ago the accident and death happened, but the family was still grieving and lost in the grief. Rachel’s mother was I thought, in denial and still angry at how life turned out for herself, she is happy for Rachel to blame herself (as mother does) for the accident, whilst refusing to admit her own failing as a mother and allow her daughter to be at peace.

    I loved the actual wedding, the musicians and the music and the simple, joyful celebration of two people starting their life together. I thought it was just how a wedding should be (without all the undercurrents and a messed up bridesmaid).

    Well acted and well worth seeing and I didn’t think it was too long, I like long movies, you can really lose yourself in them.

  2. kitterlitter

    Glad we both enjoyed ourselves so much. I don’t think you can redeem what happened only find reconciliation. That happens to a large extent except for the mother.

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