Midweek Mayhem!

Welcome to Midweek Mayhem! The place where we get to talk about anything and everything; now with decreased job security!  So post at your peril.

On a personal note, I’ll be fleeing the country on Friday and won’t back til mid-Feb.

I’ll try and stick my nose in every now and then to post, but it’ll probably be fairly sporadic…

Meanwhile try to keep it civil,  and no long ‘cut and paste’ jobs (you know who you are!!).

Cheers

reb.

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120 Responses

  1. The order of the day is: Stop Eating Frogs!! Frogs are on their last legs. http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/frogs-are-on-their-last-legs-study-20090121-7md1.html

  2. I am just back from a free hair cut. The employment agency in our building had a young girl from England looking to be employed by a local hairdresser and they needed a guinea pig for a haircut so they can check out her performance.

    Naturally no woman will volunteer, just in case it doesnt work out, LOL. So I was selected by dictatorial decree.

    She did a great job and was a lovelty girl, very pleased with the results, I hope she gets the job.

  3. Can I just say that I am swealtering here at work in the sun… this damn global warming is making it too hot!

  4. “fleeing the country on Friday ”

    As I understand it, you will be visiting Vietnam. While Thailand is sometimes called the ‘Land of Smiles’, one can be excused for thinking Vietnam is the ‘Land of Frowns’ – if, (and only if) because of the first impressions of the guys who process you on landing.

    I’m told many of them are ex-‘Viet Cong’ Army types with absolutely no sense of humour. Don’t try to be funny. It’s a bad move. Makes one think it was a mistake to come. They provide perfect examples of how NOT to welcome tourists. All trained by Basil Fawlty apparently.

    Outside get a taxi but make sure you agree on a price and both understand what currency is being discussed.

    And BTW, through Vietnamese eyes – All Westerners look the same. Lol.

  5. Why is it that CityRail air-conditioning techs go on strike at this time of the year?

    While on CityRail, is there a special school that teaches train guards a new style of English? Have they all watched that Bob Newhart clip on YouTube?

  6. I woke up this morning and realised I’d dreamt that for the last 8 years some monkey-faced guy had been US President and had totally ballsed everything up…

    How very odd.

    I must stop eating cheese before I go to bed at nights.

  7. Thanks for the tips Nature 5.

    It’s my second trip, so I know what to expect at immigration.

    I reckon it should also be called “the land of cons!”

    Anyway, the food’s nice and I’ll get some nice tailor made suits. A few nights in Hanoi followed by a few nights in Hoi An…

  8. I think this story’s been blown out of proportions.

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,24943006-29277,00.html

  9. “some nice tailor made suits”

    In Australia, salesmen say these good shoes are made in Italy. In Vietnam, good stuff is made in China. Lol.

    As for suits, watch the stitching – demand double and then check.

  10. It’s cruel reb. How could he just discard them..sigh…

  11. Nature 5,

    Yep. I always just get them to copy my favourite clothing “exactly”. They’re hopeless at trying to make something from scratch. Thailand is much better.

    I’m think I’m onto my fifth generation of a copy of a waistcoat I had copied from an original I bought in London many many years ago…

  12. I wanna get a suit made from kids pyjama material (like Buzz Lightyear). But for some perculiar reason, the boyf says that if I wear it near him he will ignore me. 😈

  13. Well that would certainly make a statement round the office joni!

  14. There was a show on TV eons ago where they took statements and pieced them together. With due respect to Blogocrats here is my effort.

    The man allegedly smashed his way into the shop, had sex with blow-up dolls and discarded them in an alley.
    As for suits, watch the stitching – demand double and then check
    I wanna get a suit made from kids pyjama material (like Buzz Lightyear).

    Hugs MinXXX

  15. Happy holz Badass, you must be overdue. Enjoy the break.
    I haven’t had holidays for about 5 years, mainly due to fluid employment conditios, but I’m due in October ’09 & now that I’m on a good salary damned if we ain’t gonna go away somewhere nice.
    I have great memories of the holidays I had with my parents as a youngster & it’s about time that my own young family makes some of its own. The daily, weekly, monthly, yearly grind tends to wear you down & sometimes (especially as a shiftworker) I start to wonder if work is the only reason I draw breath.

  16. Not too sure about the necessity of suits, cheap, Buzzed-out or otherwise. People in suits make me suspicious.

  17. LOL people in suits make me suspicious too Toilet especially in todays economic climate.

  18. Granted, somebody has to run the show, but to me a suit says “my clothing is ergonomically impractical therefore I don’t move often enough to be tangibly useful”.

    As you can probably surmise, I am not a “suit”.

    Apologies to the good people here who I may be generalising about.

  19. I confess, I’m a “suit” but I tend to go for ones that are a touch “flambouyant”.

    My favourite is a grey one which has “startling” violet pin stripes! I wear it with a pink striped tie and matching cufflinks!

    The girls in the office often remark “I wish I could get my husband to wear something like that!”

    I’ll be looking to get a nice linen suit made while overseas, and some waistcoats.

    I’ve always gone in for the “formal” look but with fabrics and patterns that are a bit more off the wall than the standard office attire.

    Therefore I can BOTH fit in to the office environment, but not so quietly make a statement about individual expression at the same time!!

    🙂

  20. “The clothes make the man”

    as someone once said.

    🙂

  21. I wear a suit and I look spiffy. It’s the national dress of Canberra.

  22. I bought a carton of beer last week, stuck it in the fridge and have not touched it since…I’ve lost interest in drinking!

    I will force myself to have a few on Australia day.

  23. I’m sure you do Miglo.

    Do you go in for the double vented look?

    Personally I look upon those suit jackets with some disdain. It’s like they’re designed to be worn while you go to the toilet…!

  24. “I’ve lost interest in drinking”

    The same thing happened to me between 8.30am and 4.00pm today.

    Fortunately things resumed as per normal from 5.00pm…

  25. Reb,

    I wouldn’t have a clue what the double vented look is, but if they are as you say they are then my answer is no.

    I’m far too conservative.

  26. Soz guys, I wasn’t having a dig at your worth, well maybe at migs.

    I say that if “the suit maketh the man” then it’s no wonder the world is f@cked largescale. Cosmetics are pleasing to the eye but productivity is achieved through motility.

  27. “Fortunately things resumed as per normal from 5.00pm…”stuntster

    My interest was enthusiastically rekindled at about 4:00pm. I tseems to be gaining ground as I type.

  28. “double vented”migs

    I reckon bird’s & snakes have single vents from which they conduct bodily functions, no doubt completely unrelated as both birds & snakes at least perform useful ecological roles.

  29. “the suit maketh the man”

    You’re right there – hides a multitude of flaws, both physical and mental. Crooks (on both sides of the law) wear suits too, they give a false impression of honesty and good character.

  30. I’m think I’m onto my fifth generation of a copy of a waistcoat I had copied from an original I bought in London many many years ago…

    So, you wear >a href=”http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb214/fogeyunlimited/Dec03k.jpg”>a waistcoat; with or without fob-watch?

  31. Toiletmaestro,

    You misquoted me.

    I said the “clothes” maketh the man, not the “suit”

    “clothes” and how you wear them is a much broader concept than just wearing a “suit”

    even the “confines” of a suit, allows one the felixibility to “break free” from assumptions or presumuptions. Which is what I do regularly.
    🙂

  32. Oh Sh*t. Just have a look at this pic of Reb:

  33. Tony,

    You c**t! How did you find that…???!!!!

  34. “Toiletmaestro,
    You misquoted me.”badass reb of stunts

    Indeed I did, for what it’s worth I find it very hard to picture you conforming to my generalised assumption about “suits”.
    Tony & migs on the other hand, I bet they’ve both got massive compensatory shoulder pads in their powersuits.

  35. Actually Toliet Boss, it was Kittylitter that misquoted me.

    “Apologies offered*

    As for shoulder pads, I think Julie Bishop outdoes anyone …!

  36. Re suits. I wear one when I need to look respectable. So I’d admit that suits do conceal a multitude of sins.

    I’m rather fond of the double vented look though I’m not sure whether they are designed to facilitate ablution, or the discharge of waste.

    It is a traditional cut, therefore a more respectable facade.

  37. F**k it’s hot here (even in Tasmania!) how’s everyone else coping…?

  38. “It is a traditional cut, therefore a more respectable facade.”

    Oh bollocks!

    That’s just the “roger moore” in you coming out…!

    🙂

  39. By the way, I’ll be thinking of you all, while I sup on afternoon daquiri’s by the pool at the E&O hotel in Penang…

  40. “F**k it’s hot here (even in Tasmania!) how’s everyone else coping…?”reb

    My part of the world has been expuisite (weatherwise) for the last couple of months. Mid to high twenties daily with afternoon southerly sea breezes. Have only had 1 day over 40 & very few over 30.

    This leads me to think that I’ve got some heatwaves coming in spades & that “actual” summer is gonna sear into the first half of Autumn.

    I’m sure Anus Bolt would be able to spin that some way or other, most likely his own way. The pillock himself returns to the blogosphere on Tuesday, after managing to conveniently avoid taking his usual inflexible stance on the Palestinian question whilst on holidays; I guess he’ll remedy that pretty quickly.

  41. It’s hot here too reb. So hot in fact, that I didn’t wear my suit jacket. I felt like a real pleb.

  42. Speaking of ablutions and suits, I’m wondering how aquanut fares in his wetsuit. My guess is he shits his pants at the sight of any approaching fish longer than half a metre.

  43. Miglo – a jacket??!!

    I thought the standard issue of clothing for the public service in Canberra was shorts, walk socks, short sleeved polyester shirt (for summer). Winter attire was a little more flexible, but always combined with a buttoned up cardigan?

    First the public service abandons the intelligence test (allowing Port Adelaide supporters in), then the traditional attire of goes out the window.

    When did the dress standards slip? Is the ALP responsible?

  44. I queried $16.95 extra interest charged on my ANZ Creditcard, over and above normal. I was told it was for a cash advance done in 2007.

    That was to buy my dog, Diesel on a Sunday, and we couldn’t eftpos that much cash, but Coles was happy to let us have it via the creditcard.

    We paid the amount into the card the next day.

    CHECK THIS: I was told I had to apply for a “cash advance balance” and a payout figure, then pay it out.

    Can you believe that? I have been paying that interest for over 16 months, and i don’t check my statement. I will now though.

  45. ducksta after seeing johns mankini i now wear one, its about the freedom, your close about the half meter thing .

  46. ‘I thought the standard issue of clothing for the public service in Canberra was shorts, walk socks…”

    I don’t think that walking, or indeed leaving one’s desk is encouraged anymore. This may explain the change in dress code.
    According to some, after the Libs were routed, public service uniforms were manufactured with an extra pocket to contain their now mandatory little red book.

  47. Angel, on January 21st, 2009 at 8:17 pm

    Angel, you must marry a book-keeper! The little books and third degree questions are worth it (never, ever, paid interest on our CC – and she fought and won against the ATO not once, not twice but thrice – with apology when running the business!)

    ——————————————–

    As for bloody suits – I was feeling pretty clever in the first year of business, in ’92 – never made so much dough – so I had two suits made – $1200! Spent most of the next 15 years on mine sites, in jeans (that I had always avoided!) and only wore “the uniform” (suits) into Brissy for occasional meetings with “management”…. (I avoid suits and avoid the city)

    …last year, as you know, sreb, 😀 I started singing again – so needed a new suit – $99 from Lowes and $48 to “modify” it to my slipstream physique 😉 – simple black, black shirt, maroon (GO BRONCO’s) velvet bow tie – nice compliments from MEN (?) and the ladies (The Minister was a little jealous, methinks!)

    Lesson learnt – want a suit – best deal – at Lowes!

  48. I am being mistakenly misquoted, the person that I quoted and was the original quoter is and remains-

    Toiletboss, on January 21st, 2009 at 6:38 pm Said:

    Soz guys, I wasn’t having a dig at your worth, well maybe at migs.

    I say that if “the suit maketh the man” then it’s no wonder the world is f@cked largescale. Cosmetics are pleasing to the eye but productivity is achieved through motility.

  49. Don’t public servants in Canberra wear Safari Suits?

    Most of the “advice” 😆 is 40 years old! 😆

  50. “needed a new suit – $99 from Lowes”

    Nice. Made from the finest quality viscose, no doubt.

    The electrostatic feel, I’m sure the sparks fly when you’re wearing it.

  51. I say that if “the suit maketh the man” then it’s no wonder the world is f@cked largescale. Cosmetics are pleasing to the eye but productivity is achieved through motility.

    mo what?

  52. Tom of Melbourne, on January 21st, 2009 at 8:45 pm Said

    Luv it! 😆

  53. “mo what?”TB

    LOL, probably not the correct context to use “motility” but what I was getting at was “self-propulsion” as a function of usefulness & subsequent productivity. Am really getting into the realms of wild generalisations here BTW.

  54. Yes Kittylitter, it was I. Not sure why reb jumped horses midstream.

  55. kittylitter

    not to be a smartarse – OK to be a smartarse!

    I have posted on the 10 Reasons to Impeach Bush thread

    Would be interested in your reply (and N5 if it is around)

    The Minister calls with dinner! (s’alright my turn tomorrow!)

  56. Will have a quick look now TB, just off out myself!

  57. TB Queensland,

    “N5 if it is around”

    Can now understand how you made millions with your consultancy. It was your PR skills. Lol.

  58. Angel: You bought a dog called Deisel?

    Should have bought a dog named Unleaded. Much cheaper!

  59. i like to get gas

  60. Just for you folks……..

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,24945114-7583,00.html

  61. Spartra

    As most on here know I know longer have the desire to comment on the conflict.

    However.

    A very interesting read. I certainly know that if 3,500 rockets were fired at Australia from the border of another country when we are not at war ( irrespective of history, religious beliefs or any other reason) I would expect all out war against the aggressor in protection of our citizens and property. To me 3,500 rockets is enough convincing that one side does not want peace.

  62. HI Shane. I tried to psot an answer to your question on wages, but it’s not accepting from me at the moment.

    This site msut have had a common sense filter installed.

  63. No Tom,

    It has a grammar filter installed. Your post has been unspaminated!

  64. I certainly know that if 3,500 rockets were fired at Australia from the border of another country when we are not at war ( irrespective of history, religious beliefs or any other reason) I would expect all out war against the aggressor in protection of our citizens and property…

    Would you also expect your country to have imposed a blockade upon the other nation when we are not at war? A blockade that severely restricts the necessities of life and starves the people?

    To me 3,500 rockets is enough convincing that one side does not want peace.

    How many deaths from those 3,500 rockets?

  65. hi shaneinqld

    What would you expect our country to do to protect us if another country had it’s citizens building new settlements/houses on our land?

  66. “another country had it’s citizens building new settlements/houses on our land?”

    I’d call it the First Fleet!!

  67. Must be why it’s called Invasion Day!
    Isn’t invasion another word for war?

  68. Ah good old Terra Nullius, the land that nobody owned because the Poms couldn’t see neatly plowed fields and cattle grazing within the confines of neatly contructed fences.

    Murray Islanders were only granted land rights because they could prove that their forefathers had constructed rock barriers, thereby proving their fishing and land rights.

  69. MIn

    No truer words.

    While I think we all should grow together as a country and I should not be held responsible for my ancestors actions.

    I remain ashamed at how our ancestors colonised the country in the first place.

  70. And after 2 months Telstra is still sending our phone bill to our previous address, in spite of the fact that we now have a new phone number which is 07 rather than 02.

    I could gone a while..I have to get through to Telstra and someone who knows the difference between Billinudgel and Banora Point.

  71. Shane, it is difficult to assign our own contemporary standards to our ancestors. I don’t think a sense of shame is necessary. The sense should be a willingness to correct the consequences as best we can

  72. Shane,

    While I think we all should grow together as a country and I should not be held responsible for my ancestors actions.

    I remain ashamed at how our ancestors colonised the country in the first place.

    Well, those are two contradictory statements for a start. But, for the sake of an argument, let’s just say they could both be true.

    This feeling of being ashamed: does it occur often? Or only under certain circumstances? Or only when you are in the presence of certain company?

    Or are these not actual feelings, but theoretical ones? Ones you would declare in a multiple choice quiz, for example, because you think that would be the ‘right’ answer?

    I ask only because Monday is Australia Day, and I will be enjoying myself, throwing a chop on the barbie a la Sam Kekovich, and thanking my lucky stars that my ancestors came to such a wonderful country. What you will be doing?

  73. *will you*

  74. And so where did your ancestors come from, and most importantly Why.

  75. Tony

    I will be celebrating Australia day as well. We have achieved many things and have much to celebrate, but it doesn’t mean I cannot feel ashamed of how we colonised this country.

    The Germans love their country and celebrate their history but they are ashamed of what Hitler did.

    Please explain how you think the two cannot be true.

  76. Min,

    From various parts of the Anglosphere, and for various reasons, unique to each. Are you making a particular point?

  77. Tom of Melbourne, on January 22nd, 2009 at 2:11 pm Said:
    Shane, it is difficult to assign our own contemporary standards to our ancestors.

    And so lubra hunting was an ok activity. My granny (who was a very English lady from Northampton..who trained at St Guy’s Hospital) fed the refugees at her kitchen door circa 1940’s at Tungamah. Those women fleeing from the authorities whose crime it was to have half white children.

  78. Shane,

    From Merriam-Webster Online:

    Main Entry: ashamed
    Pronunciation: \ə-ˈshāmd\
    Function: adjective
    Etymology: Middle English, from Old English āscamod, past participle of āscamian to shame, from ā- (perfective prefix) + scamian to shame — more at abide, shame
    Date: before 12th century

    1 a: feeling shame, guilt, or disgrace b: feeling inferior or unworthy
    2: restrained by anticipation of shame

    If describes how you feel about the actions of your ancestors, then you haven’t contradicted yourself at all. It does sound like a lot of baggage to have to carry around, though, particularly for something you admit you “should not be held responsible for”.

  79. If *that* describes

  80. No Min, I don’t seek to excuse this at all.

    You apparently have a fascination with genealogy, I don’t. Therefore I perhaps don’t feel a particular connection with my forebears. Shame about something I didn’t do, had no connection with, no control over… I think shame is the wrong emotion. I prefer to accept responsibility for what I am able to do.

    And as I said in my earlier post – “The sense should be a willingness to correct the consequences as best we can”

    I’m not sure, but do you have a problem with us doing our best to correct the consequences?

  81. Tony of South Yarra, on January 22nd, 2009 at 2:33 pm Said:
    Min,

    From various parts of the Anglosphere, and for various reasons, unique to each. Are you making a particular point?

    Yes Tony I suspect that I am. The study of family history is a wonderful thing. It’s amazing how many preconceived notions are blown out of the water once one learns about one’s own family’s history.

    During my couple of decades as a family historian I have seen princes from pauper and widdershins.

    The ‘why’ is why are we now sitting here in downtown Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide, WA, NT plus of course regional areas and this is a matter of history. For example, if a person is a 4th generation from say Echuca then best guess is that their gg/grandies would have arrived via SA probably as indentured servants and from there worked on the river boats..and from their to the goldfields of Victoria/NSW.

    Anyway..not many people are interested in Australian history.

  82. Tony

    A lot of baggage. You make it sound as though i whip myself with a cat o nine tails while wailing about the horrors of the past.

    I think you are becoming very technical in your attempt to prove a point. Your definition 1a: says a feeling of shame, guilt or disgrace, thats exatly how I feel about that one particular part of our history.

  83. OK Shane, fair enough then.

  84. Our posts crossed over. Yes I do have a ‘fascination’ with genealogy and have been a family historian for over 2 decades.

    I certainly do not expect anyone else to be in the least interested which is why I always apologise if I post something re this as I should imagine that for you young’uns that the topic is booorrrin’…

    Tom. I think that you are the exact right person to discover their family history. The cynic with no interest.

    Family history is akin to doing a very large and impressive jigsaw puzzle, put the pieces together to work out who these people were.

  85. Tony

    I plan to have a BBQ and drink beer ( but not drive) have a bet and celebrate the wonderful country we live in.

    For all its faults there is no better place on earth.

  86. Good for you Shane. If you like to bet on Melbourne races, I may have one for you on Monday.

  87. “Family history is akin to doing a very large and impressive jigsaw puzzle, put the pieces together to work out who these people were.”

    That’s probably why I’ve kept it at arms length.

    I have enough trouble trying to understand the family members I already know never mind trying to work out the ones that I don’t.

  88. Be great Tony.

    I think Melbourne is actually the best place to bet as IMHO they tend to run truer to form. Well most of the time anyway.

    We will have to discuss tips on Fridays

    Enjoy a punt. Was just given 2 tickets to the Races up here at the Sunshine Coast on Sunday ( Corbould Park). Always Sunday meetings with big fields.

    They are also having their inaugural night meeting on February 21st.

  89. MIn

    I am terrified of doing our jigsaw puzzle as I could be the missing link 🙂

  90. I’m afraid that I am a piece from a different puzzle. Kerplunk?

    Oooooo – is this now the theme for this weekends top five?

  91. reb, on January 22nd, 2009 at 3:10 pm

    Reb, the dead’uns are often far more understandable.

    And shane, quite right, you could indeed be the missing link..however, nothing ventured nothing gained.

    And likewise for joni.

    I personally come from a long line of agricultural labors and indentured servants. And I’m proud of it..Min holds head up high.

  92. My suave, sophisticated taste and exquisite demeanour and eloquence would suggest that I’m descended from the British aristocracy.

  93. Min, where do you get the info to do the geneology thing?

  94. And I take it back – he did condone rape as long as there is no ‘bruising or bleeding’ – a bit difficult to avoid when raping someone.

  95. Save our environment and create jobs. Pay people to go out and eradicate this scourge before its too late. Why do we leave things intul the death knell in the hope it will disappear.

    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,27574,24948098-29277,00.html

  96. The cleric in question should be considered no more representative of mainstream muslims than this priest should be considered representative of mainstream catholics.

    http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/priest-stole-1m-for-unholy-life/2009/01/22/1232471451257.html

  97. James I have all the Pioneer + discs for Victoria which I acquired via (hush) swaps with other genealogists. Just write to me at min underscore kelpie at yahoo dot com dot au. Or via joni or reb or scaper or aqua.

    You can do it online but I do freebies for friends. Cost might be say $27.00 for a certificate from BDMS Vic or NSW..say if no one remember’s great granny’s maiden name and so you might have to purchase a certificate. However I supply all data available and reference numbers for anyone who would like them.

  98. I will write to you, Min, I find that subject absolutely fascinating.

  99. Rigels – probably no more representative, it’s just that one was condoning the rape and beating of Australian citizens.

  100. Tom, that is an excellent summary. It’s nothing to do with religion, but its about as you say condoning the raping and beating of Australian citizens.

    Often people waffle on about one religion or the other (and I plead guilty) but when push comes to shove it’s exactly as Tom says.

  101. Rubbish it had nothing to do with religion. If the bloke had not been a Muslim cleric his statements would never have been reported.

    They were reported to imply that the clerics opinions were indicative of the opinions held by all Muslims.

    As I was pointing out, one bad apple of a cleric is not indicative of the entire religion or its clerics.

    But if you want to believe that it was only about an unacceptable statement by the cleric, then feel free keep deluding yourselves.

  102. I wanted to contribute to the discussion today on our forbearers and their treatment of Indigenous Australians. Work duties come first so I had to sit it out until tonight. Sorry for the lateness.

    I think that more Australians would feel ashamed of the practices of past governments and our ancestors if more was told about their practices and why they did what they did. To understand this, we need to look inside their heads and get a grasp of the ideologies that drove them.

    I have my own opinions, and I might refer to that great historical work “A review of the racist ideologies of Social Darwinism and eugenics in colonial Australia in the formative years of Federation, and how these ideologies were applied to purify and secure a White Australia”.

    Here goes:

    As Australia celebrated its centenary of Federation the enquiring few raised the often-overlooked question of “Why did the colonies federate?” Among a variety of reasons, some historians attested that one of the prime movers behind Federation was likely to have been the emerging sense of nationhood of the mid to late nineteenth century. Or rather, it is argued, that the need to maintain and consolidate a sense of ethnic identity was perhaps more of a factor.

    The celebrations trumpeted that Federation was the peaceful making of a nation whose sovereignty rested in the people. But there is also another story. Federation marked the birth of a nation whose primary purpose was to maintain an independent line from London on order that the local initiatives of White Australia and the regime of racial separation of Aborigines could be set in place. Driven by the doctrine of Social Darwinism, the Australian colonists were anxious to maintain what was seen as ‘white purity’. This ‘purity’ was perceived to be under threat of ‘decay’ from the Indigenous population (and from the invasion of Chinese who had arrived as diggers on the goldfields in the mid 19th century). This threat to the social and moral well being of an emerging Australian type was arguably an active agent in promoting the discourse of Social Darwinism in popular consciousness, which ultimately gained expression in the White Australia Policy.

    The colonist’s racial ideals and preoccupations leading up to the formative years of Federation (and the White Australia Policy) are important. The development of ideological changes and their emergence in colonial Australian society in the late nineteenth century is considered of major importance. ‘Ideologies’ is seen as key word in the analyses of racial ideals. Ideology is used to indicate the frameworks of thought which is used in society to make sense of or give meaning to the social world. Subsequently, their position as a set of unquestioned values and social practices by and through which the colonial Australians placed themselves in the social world forms one of the major elements.

    Racism, as an ideology, provided rationale to European social interests and expressed social myths about other perceived ‘racial’ groups. Many historians have examined how European racial ideals and preoccupations leading up to the formative years of Federation had a major influence on Australian political and intellectual life. In particular, they identify that Herbert Spencer’s theory of evolution in the social sciences, known as Social Darwinism, emerged as a major component of western views about race and indoctrinated that the principles of biological evolution should be applied to the social order. This provided a seemingly scientific explanation for the attempted destruction and genocide of Aboriginal societies and cultures. Conversely, it is recognised that British colonial rule made a serious effort to ensure that Aborigines – as British subjects – enjoyed certain rights. It is argued, however, that this ineffectual imperial framework of rights was abandoned in the era of Federation and the dominant colonial ideology that placed Aborigines in a position that was distinct from British citizenship.

    It is argued that Social Darwinist ideology about the future of the Australian ‘race’ as a whole was a telling motive behind the reason to federate. Federation was the rationale to maintain white superiority and racial homogeneity. Without an Indigenous population the Darwinist ideology applied to social evolution and its subsequent racist applications towards foreign non-whites may have taken on different tenets. Perhaps too, the call for a ‘White Australia’ may not have been so vociferous.

  103. Rigels said – “Rubbish it had nothing to do with religion.”

    Religion is relevant to this discussion. This is because religious leaders carry a much higher moral authority than others.

    The rape of a boy or girl is appalling in any circumstance. When the crime is committed by a priest it is a crime of the worst order. A priest holds a position of trust in his community; he has abused youth directly , and the community he is supposed to serve.

    When a leader of another religious community suggests that the beating and rape of women is an appropriate way to run a household, it is abuse of the Australian women as individuals directly affected, and abuse of the community he is supposed to serve.

  104. Oftenwoof’nwhinge,

    Unleaded might be cheaper, but Diesel goes a lot further.

    Anyway, Diesel now lives with the people 2 doors up, as they wouldn’t let me bring a Saint Bernard t work. I was very upset.

  105. Angel. I’ve heard St. Bernards are heavy drinkers. Seem always to have a flask of alc aboard their person.

    You seem to upset easily. Rather uncharacteristic of someone so stoic as thou (wink).

  106. Is anyone else a little concerned by this revelation?

    http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=neCIg0BiXbE

    I mean, I guess what goes on in marriage is ok, as long as it’s consensual, but it is kinda weird……

    Thoughts?

  107. That’s heavy stuff miglo!
    As you say, largely swept under the carpet.

    I hazard a guess that there won’t be too many “proud Australians” raising that as a hypothesis on Australia day while we have our nation pride masturbated to the rhythm of the jingo drum.

  108. “I mean, I guess what goes on in marriage is ok, as long as it’s consensual, but it is kinda weird……
    Thoughts?”

    Hmmm, I did hear “fisting”, right?

    Hmmmmmm.

    Different strokes I guess, can he be impeached for it?

  109. Perhaps not, and he shouldn’t be assuming it’s consensual. But really, what is it with Democrats and their sexual practices. I was prepared to forgive JFK, I mean, who would knock back Marilyn Monroe? As for Clinton, well how would you be if Hilary was your wife? But now I’m beginning to see a pattern. Bush, for his many faults, at least lived a clean, God-fearing existence, that we know of……

  110. Thanks Tboss.

    That great historical work that I referred to: “A review of the racist ideologies of Social Darwinism and eugenics in colonial Australia in the formative years of Federation, and how these ideologies were applied to purify and secure a White Australia”, was actually my Honour’s thesis!

    25,000 words of controversy.

  111. Migs, it’s not something I have a detailed awareness of. Sadly it makes plenty of sense in a historical context.
    I take it that the 25,000 words of controversy are available?

  112. Bush, for his many faults, at least lived a clean, God-fearing existence, that we know of……

    You are joking, right? Bush has a well know past history of drinking and cocaine abuse, violence and bad behaviour. He is supposed to have ‘found god’ and been re born.

    I always thought it was a bad decision for Bush, as a politician, to refuse to acknowledge his wild youth — which, by his own account, lasted until he was 40

    While POTUS

    Some have wondered if he ever really stopped.

  113. Tboss, I was meant to lodge both an electronic copy and a hard copy at the uni, but when I finished Honours I just wanted to get the hell out of the place.

    I still have my own electronic copy

  114. One day, Kittylitter, one day, you might develop a sense of humour. Let me assure you, life is a whole lot better when you have one.

  115. Very interesting Kittyl. Ritalin is a stimulant which when utilized for sufferers of ADHD has a reverse effects.

    However, if Bush is on Ritalin (a stimulant), assuming that he is not ADHD, then another stimulant Prozac. And then cocaine, known to cause severe depression, the question might be is he/was he using Ritalin and Prozac as uppers re a cocaine addiction?

  116. Wow, Kittylitter, that evidence you linked to is simply irrefutable!!!! Tom Flocco!! Now he’s the one that wrote that Bush was escaping to Saudi Arabia to avoid charges is he not? And the first link? Talks about alcohol, a legal drug, yet I can’t see anything about coke. But that’s ok, KL, it’s fine just to pull a couple of BS articles off the net and use them as evidence of something far greater than what’s even alleged in their discredited original form. Kind of like accusing every religion of insisting that women submit (sexually by context of the subject) to men. Don’t let the truth get in the way of a good slander will you?

  117. Wow, Kittylitter, that evidence you linked to is simply irrefutable!!!! Tom Flocco!! Now he’s the one that wrote that Bush was escaping to Saudi Arabia to avoid charges is he not?

    Salon – not credible? LOL
    Well apologies for some very quick research as i’m late for work and hurrying like crazy – I know that there are many more sources of credible info out there. If you want better sources, it’ll have to be later on – the Blogocracy night shift.

    It’s common knowledge that Bush was into drug and alcohol abuse until rather late in life, pretty much a rich, layabout ne’er do well.
    His administration has tried hard to scrub it all from the public record but Bush was a bad boy!
    Can’t believe that you don’t know this very basic stuff that’s been public for years – do you live in some kind of vacuum bubble where only what you want to believe gets through?

  118. Kind of like accusing every religion of insisting that women submit (sexually by context of the subject) to men.

    Actually, didn’t say submit sexually at all, what I did say was all religions expect women to submit to men. You very kindly added your own interpretation of sex and rape to my words.

    Prove me wrong, which are the religions that practice equality with women in their bible interpretations and their teachings?

  119. One day, Kittylitter, one day, you might develop a sense of humour. Let me assure you, life is a whole lot better when you have one.

    Delicious irony. One day you just might say something that is remotely humorous – cheers!

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